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7-Plus-NGM Digest March 2004

Date: Tue, 02 Mar 2004 21:54:04 -0800
From: Trevor Heath

Subject: More steam in India



Some brilliant photography from Rob Dickinson from his February 2004 visit to India including a 2 foot Narrow Gage coal mine railway, Massive Corliss valved stationary engines in a sugar mill, a sugar mill railway out of the 19th century and a look at preserved steam.

http://dspace.dial.pipex.com/steam/trains/india037.htm

http://dspace.dial.pipex.com/steam/trains/india034.htm

http://www.messiaen.co.uk/steam/mills/india01.htm

http://dialspace.dial.pipex.com/steam/trains/india035.htm

Date: Fri, 05 Mar 2004 10:33:18 -0800
From: Dennis Dalla-Vicenza

Subject: Tin Can Sterling



Hi all,

Someone on this list sent me photocopies of the "Tin Can Sterling Engine" and I was thinking of scanning the pages and making a PDF of them and having them placed on the web for free downloading. I am in the process of packing up my office prior to our planned move and came across the file in sorting.

How many people would be interested and who could host them for me? I think either Trevor, Father J and Jim would be likely suspects but are there others?

kind regards
Dennis
Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2004 19:01:28 -0800
From: "Robert Morris"

Subject: The BunYip 0-6-2T



Hello Group,

Can anyone provide information regarding the 7.25" gauge 0-6-2T's from down under featured in AME several years back? I believe the engine is modeled after a Fowler Sugar Plantation Engine? What issues covered the build of this engine in AME? Just Currious..

Thanks,

Robert M.

Date: Fri, 05 Mar 2004 20:32:40 -0800
From: Dennis Dalla-Vicenza

Subject: Re: The BunYip 0-6-2T



Robert,

I started receiving AME with issue 87 so all my information on the Bunyip prior to that is speculation. Issue 87 of AME (November December 1999 had installation part 9 so you would have to back track to issue Issue 78 in 1998 if everything is even. It is a nice looking engine and I have video showing them in operation around Au and they look like good runners.

AME retail still lists all the books as available and priced at $7.50 (issues 82 to 99) or $7.90 (issues 100 to 102) and of course quoted in Australian dollars. They can be reached at sales@ameng.com.au and they accept plastic and there is a minimum shipping charge of $3.50 per issue but on bulk orders to the USA or Canada they charge by the order which is substantially cheaper. If the numbers are different than what I quoted AME retail can respond to us by replying to this note. I want to purchase all back issues to number one and will be ordering a year or two at a time starting once we have resettled up north.

kind regards
Dennis
Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

Date: Sat, 06 Mar 2004 06:31:05 -0500
From: Ronald Thibault

Subject: Re: Tin Can Sterling



Dennis;
I'd be more than happy to post them on my site.

Ron Thibault
Warrenville, SC USA
http://personal.atl.bellsouth.net/t/h/thib9564/

Date: Sat, 6 Mar 2004 05:41:09 -0600
From: "Thomas"

Subject: Re: Tin Can Sterling



I have a plan to make a "tin can sterling engine" (as yet not built), but would like to see the one you have. It could be better and I want to make one. Please post it so we can all see it.
The one I have the plan for is a real novelty, and I think most anyone could build it.
I saw the one I have a plan for, running at a show and it was a crowd pleaser.

Thomas

Date: Sat, 6 Mar 2004 09:25:38 -0600
From: William Baggett

Subject: Re: Tin Can Sterling



I recall being fascinated as a youngster with a biography of Glenn Curtis (the aviation pioneer), who reportedly began his earliest experiments by building working internal combustion engines from tin cans (he eventually set a world land speed record on a motorcycle of his own design/including engine).
I've always had a grand time imagining how a tin-can engine could be built...I must admit that the story has always served as great inspiration. Wonderful to see that something as common as a tin-can has the capacity to do something so marvelous in the hands of someone who sees an everyday object...in a way that others aren't seeing it.Truly excited about seeing the tin-can sterling engine and hoping that some of the pieces of the old puzzle in my head may finally reveal themselves.

Bill Baggett

Date: Sat, 6 Mar 2004 08:20:28 -0800 (Pacific Standard Time)
From: "Boyd Butler"

Subject: Engines



Robert, I think the engine you are referring to is now sold in kit and RTR form by Roll Models in I think 3 3/4 scale 7.5 or 7.25 gauge.
Boyd

Date: Sat, 06 Mar 2004 22:50:19 -0000
From: "gmam4088"

Subject: Bunyip.



Hello Robert,

The Bunyip is modeled on the Bundaburg Fowler built by the Bundaburg Foundry Co. in Queensland Aistralia in the early 1950's.
Ian Smith's series started with issue 79, July - August 1998. The final installment was in issue 102, May - June 2002 24 parts in total.
The overall sizes of the comlpeted loco are Lenght 1917mm Width 612mm and height 952mm, a big chunky loco.
A vist to the AME website would be worth will there are links to some of the ozzie clubs were you might find some photos of the models and possiably the full size locos.
www.ameng.com.auwill find them.
I have been getting the AME since it was relaunched with issue 33, November 1990. The next one 113 must just about be in the mail by now.It is a very well produced and in formitive magazine. Will it is the "local" modelling engineering magazine, being published acroos the pond in Australia, I think it is possiably the best one available on the face of the planet.

As Dennis said the back issues are avaiable. There are castings also available see issue 80 for the details the producer did not have a email address back then, this may have changed.

The loco that Boyd has just referred to are the Keith Watson designs from Western Australia.

Ian McKay
New Zealand

Date: Sat, 6 Mar 2004 15:01:27 -0800
From: "Robert Morris"

Subject: RE: Bunyip.



Hello Ian,

Yes AME is quite the magazine! I have just received my first 2 issues and I just love it! Thanks for the information regarding the BunYip engine. I really like the looks of this engine and would like to get my hands on the articles so that I can study other methods of Locomotive design. I am currently building a large scale 0-4-0 but in the future who knows what's next! I just know that if there is a chance to get information and parts one should take it while they can! I have contacted the sales department regarding the issues and should be on my way.

More news later,

Robert M.

http://home.earthlink.net/~reeco/id14.html

Date: Sat, 06 Mar 2004 18:13:19 -0800
From: Dennis Dalla-Vicenza

Subject: Re: Bunyip

.

Ian,

Were you with Dave Giles at the BCSME meet (the one before IBLS 2000) in Vancouver BC. I have a film I am editing and converting to DVD at the moment and Dave introduces the Guy behind him and I can't make out more than "Ian" and even that I'm not sure of. I have to get an E-Mail off to Dave to clarify.

kind regards
Dennis
Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

Date: Sun, 7 Mar 2004 02:00:48 EST
From: GengH@aol.com

Subject: Re: Tin Can Sterling



I hope someone will offer to post the drawings of the tin can sterling engine. It would be a neat project.
George Hoke

Date: Sun, 07 Mar 2004 12:05:13 -0000
From: "Andrew"

Subject: Bunyip



Hi Everyone,

Just in case that some of you don't know what a Bunyip looks like (and to give you an idea of the size) I have just posted a photo of the original Bunyip in the Photo section under the album Bunyip. You will of course see my ugly mug, but to give you an idea of the size I am 6'3" tall... so as you will see it is a BIG loco.



Spent a day last October at the Canberra track (where Bunyip is based) and spent most of it driving this wonderful loco (Ian Smith was there as well). It handles like a dream and steams like a witch!! The Briggs boiler is certainly one that can be recomended... Ian has put a speedo on it, and along the long back straight of the track I reached... I won't put anything here in case Ian finds out... lets just leave it at fast!!!

Later when I was talking to Ian, I asked about the maximun load the Bunyip will pull... He told me that they had never been able to load it to its full capacity... but theoretically it should pull 16 tonnes and still some!

Although I have no plans to build one I can recomend the design to anyone (or a club) that wants a good big powerful loco.

Andrew

Date: Tue, 09 Mar 2004 05:09:11 -0000
From: "chevwilliam"

Subject: Request for information on S-6 Independent Brake Valve.



Hi everyone,
I am sorry about the double post, I hit the wrong key.

I need information on the Westinghouse Air Brake S-6 independent Brake control valve porting and internal connections.
I mean the vlave disk arrangement, the valve plate arrangement, and the pipe bracket arrangement.
Does anyone have access to drawings or an disassembled valve that can be measured or otherwise accuratly documented for use in working up a scale reproduction?
I am currently involved with drawing the Jack Bodernmann design straigh Air brake control valve from his 'shop notes'.
This will be a several sheet document done in AutoCAD 2002/LT 2004, and we intend to post the resulting files when it is completed.
Best Regards, William J. Stewart.

Date: Tue, 9 Mar 2004 13:12:45 -0700
From: "Mike Decker"

Subject: Re: Request for information on S-6 Independent Brake Valve

.

Hi William:

I have an S-6 out in the garage in my collection of air brake "stuff". I bought it from the scrappers of the CA&E, it came off of one of their freight motors. I did what you are doing in 1965, when I designed the half-size #6-ET equipment we used at Sandley's on our 15" gauge locomotives. I didn't use AutoCad back then (though I could now), it was designed by "Universal Boardmaster" on Mylar :>)

I'm not familiar with the Bodernmann design, but I modified the operation of both the S-6 and the H-6 Automatic Brake Valve so that the train brakes were automatic, but the loco brakes were straight air. I eliminated the Distributing Valve, but used a truck Relay Valve in the Independent circuit to keep the driver brake Maintaining (against leakage) feature. The #6 Distributing Valve is just a Triple Valve with a Relay Valve attached....when an Automatic Brake Pipe Reduction is made, the "Triple" part sends the Application air through the S-6 Valve, and back down to the "Relay" part, which puts Main Reservoir air into the cylinder piping in proportion to the pressure coming from the "Triple". To independently Release the driver (and tender) brakes after an Automatic Application, the S-6, in Independent Release position, vents this air to the atmosphere. Running Position on the S-6 allows the air to Apply and Release along with the train brakes. To independently apply or release the locomotive brakes, the S-6 "straight airs" the Relay portion in the Slow Application and Quick Application positions.

The full-sized S-6 (and to a greater extent, the H-6) castings have some pretty fancy core work to route the air through the cast iron. Full size, the S-6 is only about 4 inches in diameter. Today, I suppose that a good lost wax foundry could accurately reproduce them, but I didn't have that facility, so I designed the parts for either direct drilling, or, sometimes, a groove milled in the joint face of the casting that was later covered up by the gasket. Because of that, half-size was as small as I figured we could go and still get dependable sealing between the ports with the valve.

I don't have time anymore to do all that design work, but if I can find the Westinghouse catalog sheets I have (air brake is my "thing") I'll scan them for you. They are to scale, and always have at least one dimension on them, which will allow you to scale them to whatever size you are using. I'll look for the Instruction Sheets too....Westinghouse made a cute little cardstock drawing of both Valves showing the ports, and there is a celluloid valve that is attached by a grommet that you can turn to see how the ports in the Valve and Valve seat line up. I have a set of them for the #6-ET air, but I ain't loanin' it out :>)

If it isn't secret or "proprietary", I'd like to see the Bodernmann design too.

Best,

Mike Decker

Date: Wed, 10 Mar 2004 00:36:08 -0000
From: "chevwilliam"

Subject: Re: Request for information on S-6 Independent Brake Valve.



Jack Bodernmann's shop notes and a photo of a completed valve are posted in "Brake Valve" file within the "Files" portion of the Yahoo "narrowguagebuilder" Group site.
As part of the project, I am converting his 'notes' into AutoCAD drawings, with some added data from measurements of a sample 2.5" scale valve he loaned me. We will be posting the final versions on the narrowguagebuilder's site.
I have gotten the first sheet, of several, to draft check stage and snail mailed a copy to Jack this morning.
The first sheet has top, side, and bottom views of both the 2.5 and 3.5 inch scale valves with a few dimensions to allow installation planneng and printing and scaleing the drawing if you have a accurate printer.
My drawings are done on an ANSI-B sheet template.
Perhaps you could scan your information in high resolution and post the files on this Group site for use by all.

I hope this is of use.
Best Regards,
William J. Stewart.

Date: Wed, 10 Mar 2004 02:03:30 -0000
From: "chevwilliam"

Subject: Re: Request for information on S-6 Independent Brake Valve.



Oops, that is posted in the Photos section of 'narrowgaugebuilders" group. Best Regards,
William J. Stewart.

Date: Tue, 9 Mar 2004 18:17:46 -0800
From: "Hugh Smith"

Subject: Re: Re: Request for information on S-6 Independent Brake Valve.



Bill,

I don't find a reference to "narrowguagebuilder" in Yahoo Groups. Would forward a message with the group name on it so I can find it? I am interested in the brake valve project.

Hugh

Date: Wed, 10 Mar 2004 02:53:18 -0000
From: "Curtis S. Ferrington"

Subject: Re: Request for information on S-6 Independent Brake Valve.



Hugh,

The group is actually "Narrowgaugebuilders", here's a link:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Narrowgaugebuilders

And while I'm at it; the gentlemen who Mr. Stewart has been talking about is Jack BODENMANN, a builder of the highest order and one of the nicest guys in the live steam hobby if not the world. If anyone ever gets a chance to make it to a Bitter Creek Western event (http://www.bittercreekwesternrr.org/) they should go just to meet him and get a shop tour.

Cheers,

Curtis F.
Date: Thu, 11 Mar 2004 18:45:15 +0100
From: "Hubert Wetekamp"
Subject: Tin Stirling Cycle Tin Can Heat Engine

Hi,

Dennis sent me the PDF document for the Stirling Cycle Tin Can Heat Engine.

I posted it on our homepage under http://www.7-plus-ngm.org/bilder/Tin_can_Stirling_Heat_Engine.pdf

The credit for this goes to the N.A.M.E.S. North American Model Engineering Society, as they were the original donor.

Hubert

Date: Thu, 11 Mar 2004 12:05:27 -0800
From: Dennis Dalla-Vicenza

Subject: Re: Tin Stirling Cycle Tin Can Heat Engine



Hi all,

I made a basic scanning error in the pdf file. I will have to redo and send out later today. Seems we have two step four - five pages and no parts six - seven. Sure have to find a pruff reedding progream sumplace.

kind regards
Dennis

Date: Sat, 13 Mar 2004 10:05:17 -0600
From: William Baggett

Subject: Request for headlight mounting bracket drawings/references



Wonder if anyone could suggest a source for accurate 3 view drawings for electric headlights and forward extended headlight mounting brackets for Baldwin engines during the early to mid 20th century?
Many thanks for you suggestions,
Bill Baggett

Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 13:47:14 +1100
From: "Paxon G&C"

Subject: Re: Request for headlight mounting bracket drawings/references



You could try the Quick Pic book on the D&RGW C-16 for good coverage of what looks like a Pyle-National headlight. I have used this photos to build mine for a C-19. Headlgiths were not made by Baldwin but by Pyle-National, GE, Sunbeam, and other such vendors. Baldwin just put on what the railroad wanted. Many locos were delivered without such appliances and they were installed by the railroad, also. The Loco Cyclpedias from 1900 on also have good coverage for these appliances.

Geo A Paxon

Date: Sat, 13 Mar 2004 21:22:22 EST
From: yrfavsob@aol.com

Subject: Re: Digest Number 952



Many thanks for you suggestions,
Have to be a bit more specific. That covers a whole lot of territory. What railroad - era etc., std ga or ng - country etc. There are endless combinations and answers possible.


Dennis

Date: Sat, 13 Mar 2004 20:58:52 -0800
From: James Hoback

Subject: Stan Rutledge



Stan, are you a lurker on one of these lists? Does anyone have a current e-mail address for Stan Rutledge of northern Washington state.

Thanks,

Jim Hoback
Sonora, California

Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 10:06:08 -0600
From: William Baggett

Subject: Re: Request for headlight mounting bracket drawings/references



George and Dennis,
Thanks for the feedback on this one. My quest involves two items that I'm closing-in on with a 2.5" scale C-19. First is the headlight and its details (like the side-latch and hinges), the second is the mounting bracket. I'd like to find good 3 view reference for a completely forward-jutting mounting bracket like those found on some of the C&S C-16's (or the D&RGW K-27's), rather than the more typical mount found on many of the RGS C-19's (which jut-out only slightly). Surely would appreciate any leads toward specific Loco/TrainShed Cyclopedia editions/volumes or elsewhere--that might contain such drawings/diagrams....

Bill Baggett

Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 08:11:06 -0800
From: Trevor Heath

Subject: RE: Stan Rutledge



There are two Stan Rutledge in Washington.

One in Arlington and one in Skykomish both numbers are unlisted.

You might try these e-mail address's: stan@everett.com, stan@everett.net, stan@broadwayinc.com which are associated with the person of that name who lives in Arlington.

TH

Date: Mon, 15 Mar 2004 02:01:33 -0000
From: "chevwilliam"

Subject: Re: Request for information on S-6 Independent Brake Valve

.

Hi Everyone,
I finally got the posts of Jack Bodernmann's model brake valve, with his permission, uploaded to the Files section of "Narrowgaugebuilders" in the folder on Westing house Air Brake Information , initiated my Marten Decker. I also posted an AutoCAD 2000/2002 file that is the draft first sheet of a planned set of machining drawings for the Jack Bodernmann valves and some additions. Let me know if you have any comments or suggestions on the drawings or valves. I have been having problems converting AutoCAd files to .jpg so please bear with me. Best Regards, William J. Stewart.

Date: Mon, 15 Mar 2004 10:15:01 +1100
From: "Paxon G&C"

Subject: Re: Request for headlight mounting bracket drawings/references



The shots in the Qucik Pic book provide good coverage of the latches on both the front and the side number light housings. One latch is broken, but you can determine how it should be from the other. The plqtform looks like an odd ball one on the C-16 and could have been original and sized for the large original box light. The drawing by Pruitt for the C-19 might be a better place to sort out the platform . Ithink you will find there are several common platform designs. You also might look at the Live Steam coverage of the T-12 for platform ideas. Remember that most of the early D&RGW locos had common parts and designs as they were just about all Baldwins.

Geo A Paxon

Date: Mon, 15 Mar 2004 16:57:26 -0000
From: "johansteam"

Subject: Headlight pics?



May i ask if it is at all possible to place some of the pics or drawings for the Headlights being discussed here, in the pictres or files section? Unfortunately do i not have any access to any of the books or magazines mentioned.
Thanking you kindly, in anticipation.
Johan.

Date: Mon, 15 Mar 2004 19:56:03 -0600
From: Ned Guyette

Subject: Technical Sources



Hello to all- My name is Ned Guyette and I live in Two Rivers Wisconsin.
I am interested in building a narrow gauge tank engine -either totally free lanced design or based loosely on British prototype. I am familiar with Martin Evans guide to live steam loco building . I
would like to know if there is anything more current and comprehensive for the first time builder?
I will build a gas-hydraulic or electric switcher as a relatively quick way to get on the rails, but my long term goal is for a steam engine built to 3" scale.
I have a 9" South Bend and a turn of the century verticle/horizontal mill that i have refurbished as well as gas and wire welding equipment. Are there others in the group with an interest in the Brititsh narrow gauge?

Regards, Ned

Date: Mon, 15 Mar 2004 20:01:38 -0700
From: "Mike Decker"

Subject: Re: Technical Sources



Hi Ned:

There is a fairly recent book by Jack Buckler, entitled "Build Your Own Steam Locomotive" (TEE Publishing, ISBN 1 85761 102 0). He describes building a 5" gauge Bagnall style 0-4-0T, called "Sweet Pea". There are drawings available from the casting supplier, Blackgates Engineering, for a 7-1/4" gauge version, called "Sweet William". Even if you don't build that loco, the book has all kinds of good information.

There is a new group on Yahoo Narrow Gauge builders which is starting out on a couple of 7-1/2" gauge versions of Jean Villette's Decauville style 0-4-0T "Elda", which was serialized in "Live Steam" quite a while ago.

I'm interested in Sir Arthur Heywood's 15" gauge railways.

Best,

Mike Decker

Date: Tue, 16 Mar 2004 00:30:24 EST
From: yrfavsob@aol.com

Subject: Re: Digest Number 954



Bill,

A headlight bracket such as 268 now has was built for the 1949 Chicago Railroad fair and is of non-standard D&RGW design. I built a forward mounting bracket for a modernized RGS 17 model years ago. If you want a 2.5" scale K-27 bracket contact Rich Ullin. If you're not following the D&RG/RGS specifically then there are numerous choices available. Just follow whatever bracket you like - SG and NG would have the same style catalog brackets.

Dennis

Date: Tue, 16 Mar 2004 07:40:49 -0600
From: "Thomas"

Subject: Re: Digest Number 954



How does one get in touch with Rich Ullin?

Thomas

Date: Tue, 16 Mar 2004 12:04:09 -0700
From: "Mike Decker"

Subject: Fw: [UK miniature railways] Fw: [The 7žin Gauge] HVR progress



Hi Folks:

Here's an interesting site, in line with the English railway interest we were talking about yesterday. The Hilton Valley Railway was the first 7-1/4" line in England to use the, now pretty much standard, low center of gravity coach design. The Moors Valley 7-1/4" line, with its' ride-in locos and closed coaches, is just about the ultimate extension of this idea. I had the pleasure of a tour of the Hilton Valley line with the late Rodney Weaver in 1968. It's nice to see the line being re-built.

Best,
Mike Decker
Decker's Trains
Rt. 1, Box 102-E
Hot Springs, SD 57747
605-745-5487
http://www.gwtc.net/~mdecker/index.htm

Sent: Tuesday, March 16, 2004 11:48 AM
From:
To:
Subject: [The 7žin Gauge] HVR progress

A photo can be viewed at the web site link below of the latest developments in the locomotive yard at Hilton Valley. This is clearly a work in progress shot with more stock moving and trackwork still required.
Should bring back a few memories.
http://www.evansben.supanet.com/ - view here.

Many Thanks
Ben Evans
Hilton Valley Railway

Date: Tue, 16 Mar 2004 14:04:05 -0600
From: William Baggett

Subject: Re: Request for headlight mounting bracket drawings/references



Thanks for the fine help re the headlight and mount question. Believe I'll get back to the books for a while, and may give Rich Ulin a call about his K-27 mount before a I make a final decision.
Thanks,
Bill

Date: Wed, 17 Mar 2004 21:39:10 -0800
From: Trevor Heath

Subject: Joshua Tree Meet



The attached photo was taken at the narrow gage meet held at Joshua Tree last weekend.

If anyone has any photo's of the loco's in this photo, If you could send me digital images approx. 600 x 400, I'd like to put up a web page.



Thanks,

TH

Date: Wed, 17 Mar 2004 22:05:02 -0800
From: James Hoback

Subject: Re: Joshua Tree Meet



Trevor,

No attachment present on the message I received. Could you send one direct?

Regards,

Jim Hoback
Sonora, California

Date: Fri, 19 Mar 2004 05:47:07 -0800
From: Trevor Heath

Subject: Photos of G42



Garratt G42 on the Puffing Billy Railway in Australia is in action after 40+ years

http://www.members.optusnet.com.au/~bill.russell/works/20040317.htm

Date: Fri, 19 Mar 2004 23:59:11 -0800
From: Trevor Heath

Subject: Joshua Tree & Southern



Photo's from last weekends Narrow Gage meet can be found here.

http://www.livesteaming.com/photos/photo.html

TH

Date: Sat, 20 Mar 2004 11:42:57 -0000
From: FrolinMarek@att.net

Subject: Georgetown Loop RR - closes



Hello Folks,

As several folks model the Colorado & Southern NG Railroad equipment, and some model the Westside Lumber Company Shays, I regret to share some sad news of the Georgetown Loop Railroad operation... running on old C&S trackage and with WS Shays, the Railroad company is closing after this 2004 season.

It appears the Colorado Historical Society and the Georgetown Loop RR Company, could not agree on terms for a new contract, so the RR is going to pull up and leave, at the end of the 2004 season.

A Denver Post article says the CHS wanted only a 5 years contract, higher liability insurance and such, and the Railroad wanted a 20 year, same liability and such. The CHS says they will try to find another operator, while the Railroad says some equipment will go to their Royal Gorge operation where a third rail will be added.

This is TERRIBLE news as I see it, as the GTL is an impressive operation and the only Shay operation in Colorado. The ride might be short, but its still a very enjoyable one with several great highlights.

Please see the following sites for more info, and pass the word!

Georgetown Loop RR - press release

Denver Post Article

Frolin Marek
San Antonio, Texas

Date: Sat, 20 Mar 2004 07:39:27 -0600
From: "Brian M. Marriott"

Subject: Re: Georgetown Loop RR - closes



Hi Frolin,

Thank you for forwarding this sad news to me. It seems that the folks at CHS are out to cut off one of their best assets at the knees - somewhere along the way they must have been taken over by [power-hungry?; bean-counting? whatever] individuals who have conveniently forgotten the Society's original mission. Hopefully some higher authority with more clout can knock some sense into the situation.

Makes my far too infrequent trips to the UK and seeing how they handle their preserved railway heritage even more treasured.

Regards,
Brian Marriott

Date: Sat, 20 Mar 2004 10:42:18 -0600
From: "Mudhen"

Subject: RE: Georgetown Loop RR - closes



There is probably more here than we all know, but one thread that hitting many museum operations is liability insurance. One museum I am involved with has seen it go up 200% in the last three years.
You can only raise fares so much to cover it, before you become a static museum. As with many things, the fear of lawsuits, real or frivolous is forcing many groups to make unfortunate decisions.
I would expect to see more of this in the future, unless the unlikely happens and the Congress passes some form of tort reform.

Mark Petersen
St. Charles, IL

Date: Sat, 20 Mar 2004 13:03:29 -0800
From: "Steve Hughes"

Subject: Re: Georgetown Loop RR - closes



Thanks for this sad news. At least I can plan one more visit before they close. Maybe we could stop this if someone could tell us whom to write or e-mail with our concerns.
I know there are also fewer mainline steam excursions due to the high cost of liability insurance. If this trend continues, the only ones who will be having any fun will be the attorneys and insurance companies.
Steve Hughes

Date: Sat, 20 Mar 2004 19:06:39 -0500
From: Arno Martens

Subject: RE: Georgetown Loop RR - closes



I would expect to see more of this in the future, unless the unlikely happens and the Congress passes some form of tort reform.

What, lawyers voting themselves out of future income.
That would violate Darwin's 'Preservation of the Species' principle.

Arno

Date: Sun, 21 Mar 2004 19:07:34 -0800
From: Russ Wood

Subject: Upcoming Live Steam Meet



Hi all,

Please acccept this email as a personal invitation to join us at the Over The Hill Live Steamers in Chiloquin, Oregon for our first meet in many years. We will be steaming up on May 29th and 30th 2004. Please check our website for details and signup information:

http://www.hobby-tronics.com/OTH

We having some new features that we are mighty proud of and we would sure like to share them with you. Please plan on attending and having some fun in the clean mountain air.

Russ@hobby-tronics.com
Chiloquin, Oregon

Date: Mon, 22 Mar 2004 03:08:00 -0000
From: "mosquitojunction"

Subject: Re: Georgetown Loop RR - closes



I am involved in a couple of steam and diesel excursions her in Florida.
They are all under the 501(3)(c) not for profit standings, such as our own.
They are all listed as museums.
Now my suggestion is, All museums and excursion Railroads, get together and put in writing, On a Letterhead, A request to our government.
To put a cap on liability insurance for any non profit museum, and or railroad of museum status.
If we don't, we will lose the one and only way of protecting our pioneer heritage. We all must remember that without the railroads, we may just now be getting the west won.
Bill,
The Mosquito Juntion & Western Railroad and Museum.
( The Orange Belt Railway)

Date: Mon, 22 Mar 2004 07:40:27 -0800
From: James Hoback

Subject: Re: Joshua Tree & Southern



Trevor,

Great photos of equipment on the JT&S. Thanks for posting them.

Regards,

Jim Hoback
Sonora, California

Date: Mon, 22 Mar 2004 08:48:39 -0700
From: "Lewis, Woody"

Subject: Joshua Tree & Southern



Hi,

Anyone know how many feet of 7.5" mainline the Joshua Tree & Southern has?

Thanks,

Woody Lewis
Colorado Springs, CO

Date: Mon, 22 Mar 2004 17:12:25 -0500
From: Grice Dale-MGI1833

Subject: RE: Re: Georgetown Loop RR - closes



I don't know if this would fly. IMHO, it is a good idea. Possibly the best way to go would to get groups such as ARM, TRAIN, NRHS, and AAPRCO involved as they already lobby for legislation for the preservation community.

Dale Grice

Date: Mon, 22 Mar 2004 22:19:23 -0000
From: "chevwilliam"

Subject: Re: Georgetown Loop RR - closes



I hope it works, Los Angles Live Steamers is facing an increase in insurance costs from about $1500.00 to about $25000.00 for renewal acording to the newsletter. I wonder if the other clubs will get the news at their renewal time.
Best Regards,
William J. Stewart.

Date: Mon, 22 Mar 2004 17:37:52 -0500
From: Grice Dale-MGI1833

Subject: RE: Insurance costs >> was >> Georgetown Loop RR - c loses



WOW, our organization has had slight increases that were mitigated by changing carriers, increasing deductibles, and dropping some coverage such as not allowing the organization's vehicles to be used off the property.

Rhetorical question - I wonder if ARM or TRAIN could be persuaded to change policy or if there is a niche in the either organization's policy for Live Steam groups to be members?

Dale Grice

Date: Tue, 23 Mar 2004 01:40:14 -0000
From: "mosquitojunction"

Subject: Re: Georgetown Loop RR - closes



I am also a member of the Los Angles Live Steamers. We are under the name of Southern Locomotive Works, and a non Resident, Supplier status. According to the Engine Booster (newsletter), Lew Soibelman, Quoted a price of $25,000.00, and the next quote was for 30-33 thousand. That is absurd, just because the state amusment inspectors and a bunch of know-it-alls go involved, over that small accident. LALS, has been running trains there since 1940 something. Even Walt Disney was a member. We had insurance through Mike Deeble, (train and trolly insurance)... They now don't cover anything in the state of Florida. Our premiun is still only $1885.00 a year, on private property.
Bill

Date: Wed, 24 Mar 2004 10:43:57 -0000
From: "gauge7union"

Subject: Used Trains For Sale



I'm a dealer in Used 7 1/4" & 7 1/2" gauge locomotives and rolling stock. Check over my site "Ride On Narrow Gauge Railways" . Listings are free, and there is additional info on building 7 gauge locos, laying track, etc.
Thanks very much,
Don

Date: Wed, 24 Mar 2004 16:30:48 -0000
From: "big_libby"

Subject: Lucky 7 plans

Hello all,
I have been reading thru the messages but can not find a place where I can get a set of plans for the #7. I have been looking for the old mags but have had no luck. Can anyone point me in the right direction?

Thanks

Rob Libby

Date: Wed, 24 Mar 2004 16:58:01 -0000
From: "mosquitojunction"

Subject: Maxi-Lucky 7



Big Libby, Try these links.
www.ajreeves.com/home.html
and
http://groups.msn.com/edapix/simonhphotos112scale7.msn
Also look up the Edaville R.R. pages for the prototype and pics.
Bill, Mosquito Junction & Western R/R and Southern Locomotive Works.

Date: Wed, 24 Mar 2004 12:40:39 EST
From: Jubilatede@aol.com

Subject: Re: Lucky 7 plans



As a poor propagandist for Two Foot Gauge, especially those in the State of Maine,I will be ready to help anyone else afflicted with this malady.. I use the future tense as I can't do this until I get back up north where my "stuff" is.

Somewhere in said "stuff" are the Don Young (am I remembering correstly/) articles from long ago Live Steam Mag on building Bridgton and Saco River #7 in a variety of scales creating Mini to Maxi model #7. I had, but loaned and lost, videos of a couple of hese models. There are a number of modifications that one should consider before starting in this direction. #7 at 3 3/4" to the foot is a monster.

Anyone serious may contact me off line. As Brother VanWingen intimated in an e-mail to Rob, but in one of the better zaps laod on me by a long ago speaker:"There is never enough time for one of Cam's short stories!"

Cam Brown

Date: Wed, 24 Mar 2004 10:18:38 -0800
From: Dennis Dalla-Vicenza

Subject: Re: Lucky 7 plans



Cam,

If one models the Lucky 7 in 7 1/2" gauge it would have to be 3 3/4" scale or it wouldn't be accurate.

kind regards
Dennis

Date: Wed, 24 Mar 2004 16:22:39 -0500
From: Kenneth Chenard

Subject: Re: Maxi-Lucky 7



List,

Lucky 7 dwgs and castings are available from E&J Winter (Australia) the exchange rate is quite favorable for those living in the US.

http://www.ejwinter.com.au/plan-cast.html

Ken

Date: Wed, 24 Mar 2004 17:19:06 -0600
From: trevor@livesteaming.com

Subject: RE: Digest Number 962



A free place to list equipment for sale. That is good news.

I shall be sure to use it.

Thanks,
TH

Date: Thu, 25 Mar 2004 01:17:12 -0000
From: "dmmcomo"

Subject: Re: #7 at 3 3/4" to the foot is a monster...



As that expatriate Cam Brown states, it is indeed a nice large locomotive.

Go to http://www.srclry.com to see one in action. Now those fellows at the Sandy River & Clear Lake RR know how to build NARROW gauge!

Of course, to make matters worse, if one is built to run on Cam's favorite track gauge of 7-1/4" it will actually be a bit smaller than 3-3/4" scale (3-5/*8" scale) unless it is narrow gauged to a prototype gauge of 1'-11.5" instead of the correct 2' gauge....

Rudy van WIngen

Date: Thu, 25 Mar 2004 01:18:46 -0000
From: "roberthartsoe"

Subject: Special Needs Kids



I set my railroad up to ride special needs kids on. I use "tumble form seats" for them to sit in safely.

This is slightly off subject but I think there may be a few who would like to participate. Might be a good project for RR club members to participate in .

Go to http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/2dollarclub/

This is a great way to join together to help each other and others with special needs children.

Robert Hartsoe

Date: Wed, 24 Mar 2004 21:25:45 -0500
From: Arno Martens

Subject: Re: Re: #7 at 3 3/4" to the foot is a monster...



Well Rudy,
Jimmy Small built it according to Don Young's article in Live Steam Magazine for 7-1/4" to be run on the Richmond Hill LS track. He welded a good 80% of the original ground track.

When you go to the URL above and select Rolling Stock --> No. 7 on it's first trip to Battle Creek you will get http://www.srclry.com/no73.JPG, the way it looked when it was still in Toronto.


===========
I just had a long talk with Jim.
It is still his engine and by the sheerest of coincidences, it is for sale, and it is re-gauged for 7-1/2" track.

Jim does not have a computer but if serious interest, I'll pass on the phone number.
--
Cheers,
Arno

Date: Wed, 24 Mar 2004 19:34:54 -0800
From: Dennis Dalla-Vicenza

Subject: Models for Sale Listing



I don't know about the rest of you but I always advertise to sell or view to buy on http://www.Livesteaming.com under the classifieds and it works very well for me. This service has been around for years. A good friend runs it for the world.
:o)
kind regards
Dennis

Date: Thu, 25 Mar 2004 11:02:49 -0500
From: "Nathan Kline"

Subject: RE: Lucky 7 plans



There were construction articles published in live steam magazine for the 3.5" gauge outside frame version and the 7.25" inside frame version. The articles were published in the 1977-1980 issues and might have been some in 1981 also, not sure of that though.
-Nate

Date: Thu, 25 Mar 2004 11:13:34 -0500
From: "Libby, Rob"

Subject: RE: Maxi-Lucky 7



Thanks all,
Next question is how much should I be paying for a set of these plans?

Rob Libby

Date: Thu, 25 Mar 2004 11:40:55 -0500
From: Arno Martens

Subject: Re: Maxi-Lucky 7



Since Ken so kindly put up the web page, you could have found it there.:

L123 Maxi Lucky 7 7 1/4" gauge
Plan set 19 sheets $483.79
Casting set 49 items $1839.87

Don't know what the set of castings comprises of, but that looks like a bargain.
--
Arno

Date: Thu, 25 Mar 2004 17:22:30 EST
From: SZuiderveen@aol.com

Subject: Re: Maxi-Lucky 7



The good news is that these are OZ bucks, which translate into US$360.70 and US$1320.76, according to today's OANDA converter.

The bad news is that last year when I called Winter's about some parts for a Tich I was having restored (and excellent service I got for those) they said that they did not have all of the castings in stock, and some would have to be made to order, with revised pricing. However, if anyone could figure out a way to use a good freight forwarder to get the shipping down, I suspect that the net price Yankee delivered is probably going to be better than from Reeves; where on top of higher overheads(I suspect) the Pound Sterling/Dollar ratio is absolutely horrible at the moment.

Steve

Date: Thu, 25 Mar 2004 18:20:43 EST
From: WrightRobertT@aol.com

Subject: plans or magazine ?



Is there any difference between using a set of plans (like for the lucky and maxi 7 ) or using the magazine artical?
Is there information that has been omitred from the magazine articals?

Rob Wright

Date: Fri, 26 Mar 2004 00:31:39 -0000
From: "mosquitojunction"

Subject: Re: plans or magazine ?



As in all magazine building series, some things in the text are left out to shorten the article. But if you study the plans, they are pretty strait forward, and can be figured out. In our group, everything was right, except the location of the link bracket. We now have that figured out and all is well.
We are building from a constuction series in live steam mag.
Just having a good time.
Bill, Mosquito Junction and Southern Locomotive Works.

Date: Thu, 25 Mar 2004 22:06:18 -0500
From: Arno Martens

Subject: Re: Re: Maxi-Lucky 7



Quite believable. Look at the prices for the 5" Lanky with his castings coming from the UK.
BTW didn't that article ran concurrent with Lucky 7?
--
Arno

Date: Thu, 25 Mar 2004 11:44:38 -0800
From: Greg Robinson

Subject: Min. Railway Tour of the UK (advertisement)



Hello All,

The details of our next tour have been finalized. Nearly two weeks of deluxe travel packed with as many miniature railways, full size railways, castles, museums and sightseeing opportunities as humanly possible.

A full brochure about this tour and the articles about our last UK tour can be found at
http://grandscales.com/tour2004/index.html

All the Best,
Greg Robinson,
Editor / Tour Guide

===========
P.S. Magazine Update: Issue #25 of GSQ and Vol. 12 No.1 of the 7+RAILROADER are on the drawing table. We hope to have them sent to the printer shortly.
===========
The Grand Scales Quarterly
< AHREF="http://www.7plusrailroader.com"> 7+ RAILROADER
Robinson & Associates
P.O. Box 8953,
Red Bluff, CA 96080
USA
530-527-0141
fax 530-527-0420

Date: Fri, 26 Mar 2004 00:24:53 -0500
From: "Nathan Kline"

Subject: RE: plans or magazine ?



The articles in live steam are written by the same person that designed the engine (Don Young) the articles are very thorough and take you step by step through the construction process of the locomotive and I have heard that people have built the locomotive from just the articles, but I would suggest getting the drawings also just incase there is something missing or unclear in the articles.
-Nate

Date: Fri, 26 Mar 2004 21:30:03 EST
From: SZuiderveen@aol.com

Subject: RE: plans or magazine ?



If anyone got back to Don Young with any corrections before he passed, the corrections may be a revision on the drawings. In most of the serials in Live Steam (at least in the old days) the drawings were reinked and in better shape in Live Steam; for example Raritan and any Bill Harris stuff. I have before and after copies of both, however, the Raritan drawings include revisions since the serial was published. However, the present day Live Steam does not have the same pro (part time?) drawing staff as Fitt committed to (remember he was an architect by original profession and valued clear drawings). Kozo and Don Young inked their own drawings, I believe, and were only edited for position and size when placed in Live Steam.

I just took a look at my present issue of Live Steam. I find the Balwin Flexible Beam drawings hard to read, due to the primitive AutoCad text and auto dimensioning. The Bob Reedy Climax drawings reinked by Knopf seem to better follow the original styles instituted by Fitt and are easier to read.

If anyone really wants to build a Maxi-Lucky 7, I would have them talk to Marty Knox and the folks at the Sandy Ridge and Clear Lake, as they have trouble shot and human re-engineered a Maxi-Lucky 7.

Date: Tue, 30 Mar 2004 10:04:07 -0000
From: "solarbake"

Subject: Re: Maxi-Lucky 7



Check out lucky 7 link http://groups.msn.com/edapix/simonhphotos112scale7.msnw and look in photos section for pics of one

Date: Tue, 30 Mar 2004 08:29:53 -0500
From: "Libby, Rob"

Subject: RE: RE: plans or magazine ?



OK, the research I have done puts a set of plans at around $800 , usa, dollors. Thats way more than I can do. Does anyone have a the magizines with the plans in it that the would be will to sell or scan? Or are there plans out there for the engine that are free?

Rob Libby

Date: Tue, 30 Mar 2004 14:27:19 -0000
From: "chevwilliam"

Subject: Re: plans or magazine ?



Strange? The conversion I did using "XE.COM" indicated AUD$483.79 = USD$330.645 as of 0630PST 30 March 2004. I do not think international shipping for Plans only would add USD$400.00 to the costs. Am I missing something here?
Best Regards,
William J. Stewart.

Date: Tue, 30 Mar 2004 09:36:04 -0500
From: "Libby, Rob"

Subject: RE: Re: plans or magazine ?



Maybe I did the wrong one. thanks

Rob Libby

Date: Tue, 30 Mar 2004 08:55:13 -0800
From: James Hoback

Subject: Re: Re: Maxi-Lucky 7



Ahhhh, now there is the work of a craftsman! Congratulations to who ever is/was building this loco.

Jim
Sonora, California

Date: Tue, 30 Mar 2004 10:09:02 -0800
From: Dennis Dalla-Vicenza

Subject: Re: RE: plans or magazine ?

Rob,

Place a wanted ad with Trevor's http://www.Livesteaming.com and see what happens. I found plans I was interested in on E-Bay a while back but some nut got carried away and bid more than the plans were worth to me.

Second alternative would be query Live Steam about buying the magazine back issues that carried the article. They would probably give you a break on the postage if all the books were purchased at once.

kind regards
Dennis
Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

Date: Tue, 30 Mar 2004 11:57:21 -0700
From: "Lewis, Woody"

Subject: RE: Re: Maxi-Lucky 7



Can some one tell me who "Simon H" is who is building this engine pictured here --- http://groups.msn.com/edapix/simonhphotos112scale7.msnw and his e-mail address?

Thanks,

Woody Lewis

Colorado Springs, CO

Date: Tue, 30 Mar 2004 15:11:03 -0500
From: Arno Martens

Subject: Re: Re: Maxi-Lucky 7



Jim,
it may get a tad heavy on raised 4-3/4" track.
--
Arno

Date: Tue, 30 Mar 2004 16:52:29 EST
From: Jubilatede@aol.com

Subject: Re: RE: plans or magazine ?



Dennis: Your nind is off on the same track as mine. While it wouldn't be a big moneymaker for them but if LIVE STEAM were to offer a folio of that MAXI #7 series, they would get a few orders, And make a few friends in the process.

Cam Brown

Date: Tue, 30 Mar 2004 16:55:08 -0500
From: "Libby, Rob"

Subject: RE: RE: plans or magazine ?



I think they should take all the engine build articles and make packages of them to sell.

Rob Libby

Date: Tue, 30 Mar 2004 16:24:03 -0800
From: James Hoback

Subject: Re: Re: Maxi-Lucky 7



Arno,

In the magazine series there is a photo of Fred Barnes' Lucky 7 on elevated track with straddle cars. The one in the web site photos is a 4-3/4 or 5" gauger I believe. Now with the Maxi Lucky 7, one would have to keep his keister carefully centered to manage the "tipsy factor" on elevated 7+ track. It is a BIG locomotive for 2' gauge.

Jim
Sonora, California

Date: Tue, 30 Mar 2004 20:52:48 -0500
From: Arno Martens

Subject: Re: Re: Maxi-Lucky 7



In the magazine series there is a photo of Fred Barnes' Lucky 7 on elevated track with straddle cars.

I haven't searched for the magazines but seemed to remember that Fred Barnes was a 3-1/2" loco. (Mini, Lucky and Maxi)

The one in the web site photos is a 4-3/4 or 5" gauger I believe. Now with the Maxi Lucky 7, one would have to keep his keister carefully centered to manage the "tipsy factor" on elevated 7+ track. It is a BIG locomotive for 2' gauge.

I have driven Jim Small's Maxi when it was still in Toronto and 7-1/4" gauge.
Anybody building it in that size MUST deviate from Don Young's drawings and build it either with a flip up or a removable roof section as one can only see the glass and gauge by leaning over and down to peek at them through the side window.
You couldn't do that if she wasn't stable. "tipsy factor", on a scale from 1 to 10 I'd give Jim's engine a 0.5.

(And did I say he is entertaining offers to buy and it is 7-1/2" now, just right for your neck of the woods!)
--
Cheers,
Arno

Date: Wed, 31 Mar 2004 02:37:39 -0000
From: "chevwilliam"

Subject: Re: Maxi-Lucky 7



RE: Tipsey?
Many years ago, Dave Rohrer had his running but not yet complete Sandy River #5 out at LALS and on a raised Steaming bay.
In conversation it came up as to how tipsey the engine might be, being 3.75 in scale on 7.5 gauge.
I asked David if I might try a simple experiment, and he agreed.
I leaned up against the tank and reached across to grab the other edge, then I slowly added my weight ot the locomotive until my feet were raised off the ground.
The Locomotive leaned as far as the side bearing clearance and stayed there.
At the Time I weighed about 208lbs.
I think that a 3.75 scale locomotive of this design we are discussing will have adaquate stability as long as the trackwork can support it.
Best Regards,
William J. Stewart.

Date: Wed, 31 Mar 2004 14:57:45 -0000
From: "big_libby"

Subject: Bolted or Rivit Frame



Hello all,
Can someone tell me the good and bad about using bolts or rivits to assemble the frame? I would also like to know what is involed with riviting this frame?
If anyone one hase some closeup pics of the frame and how they assembled it I would like to see them.
thanks

rob

Date: Wed, 31 Mar 2004 10:20:22 -0800
From: James Hoback

Subject: Re: Re: Maxi-Lucky 7



Yes, I had heard of this (or a similar incident) testing of the stability of Dave's loco. That loco appears to have a slightly higher center of gravity than the Maxi Lucky 7 which is really quite "squat" and therefor should be even more stable. The prototype 2' locomotives had quite a few tip overs from what I have read. More so than their 3' or standard gauge cousins. Track maintenance had to be good and I have read that they had broad curves considering their gauge. I love the looks of outside frame locomotives that appear too wide for their gauge.

Regards,

Jim Hoback
Sonora, California

Date: Wed, 31 Mar 2004 09:52:17 -0800
From: James Hoback

Subject: Re: Re: Maxi-Lucky 7



I haven't searched for the magazines but seemed to remember that Fred Barnes was a 3-1/2" loco. (Mini, Lucky and Maxi)

Yes, I believe you are right Arno. Same situation for the Mountaineer which I have always admired.

I have driven Jim Small's Maxi when it was still in Toronto and 7-1/4" gauge.
Anybody building it in that size MUST deviate from Don Young's drawings and build it either with a flip up or a removable roof section as one can only see the glass and gauge by leaning over and down to peek at them through the side window.
You couldn't do that if she wasn't stable. "tipsy factor", on a scale from 1 to 10 I'd give Jim's engine a 0.5.


Yes, the center of gravity is apparently kept low enough to be stable.
Even the original two-footers had an occasional roll over though. A little more so than 3' or standard gauge. Track work had to be maintained well. They had broad curves.

I like the appearance when someone enlarged/raised the cab roof. This may have helped with the problem you describe. I too have operated a few locomotives with long low cab roofs (15" gauge) and they are a real pain.
A little compromise would make operation a lot more fun.

(And did I say he is entertaining offers to buy and it is 7-1/2" now, just right for your neck of the woods!)

That surprises me since the Lucky 7 seemed to be the "pride of the line" there, and the only steamer I believe. That's too bad.

Cheers,

Jim
Sonora, California

Date: Wed, 31 Mar 2004 20:00:35 -0000
From: "chevwilliam"

Subject: Re: Maxi-Lucky 7



Re: Rivets versus bolts for assembly.
Old prototype practice was to basically bolt the frame and etc together using reamed holes and tapered bolts, this kept the parts managable for a small repair shop or for field repairs when necessary.
Hot Rivieting sometimes was used to join item sthat were not intended for field disassembly, eg where the items were intended to remain attached throughout the life ot the items, and only repaired at Major repair facilities.
Cold riveting was not generally used for structural assembly as it would leave the items slightly loose and over time vibration would loosten the joints further or allow corosion to gain a foothold in the joint.
I would suggest for modern model assembly where you might wish to disassemble for repairs at some future date, that "Close Tolerance" bolts be used in reamed holes for primary structural assembly.
This would include frame and 'horns', cylinders, valve gear mountings, smokebox to saddle, etc. The secondary assembly, such as accessories, bioiler mountings, etc. could be with drilled holes and standard tolerance bolts. Where items are intended to be permantly assembled and never disassembled for maintenance then you could consider riveting, either Hot or Cold methods, or welding / brazing / soldering.
Locktite is a good idea for final assembly but I would also suggest 'belt and suspenders' process and, in addition use, 'deformed thread' all-metal locknuts for the high vibration / cyclic stress areas of the frame or primary structure.
The above is my personal opinion and is provided as a suggestion only.
Best Regards,
William J. Stewart.

Date: Wed, 31 Mar 2004 23:28:46 -0000
From: "mosquitojunction"

Subject: MAXI- 7 picture



I have just posted a picture of a Maxi-7 i took a long time ago, somewhere out west, i think. It was in a box titled my trips, and magazine articles.



Bill

Date: Wed, 31 Mar 2004 23:30:25 -0000
From: "mosquitojunction"

Subject: Re: MAXI- 7 picture



Sorry guys, I forgot to mention i placed it in the photos section.