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7-Plus-NGM Digest August 2003

Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2003 00:18:17 EDT
From: GengH@aol.com

Subject: Vacuum Brakes



There has been some discussion recently about actuators for vacuum braking systems. Most of it revolves around use of vacuum advance diaphragm actuators off of older model cars and trucks that used conventional distributors. I don't know of any current vehicles that use this type distributor. Replacement distributor actuators are still available thru NAPA but they are expensive, around $25 or more. Used ones are getting harder to find and if they have rubber diaphragms they are likely to fail soon.
Many modern vehicles use vacuum to control the heating and air conditioning systems and they usually have several actuators. One that I have found that looks like a good candidate for our braking systems comes off of the 1990's vintage Ford Taurus. The steel actuator housing is about 2 3/16th OD by 2 5/16ths long. The stroke is about 3/4". I put one of these on each truck of my tender and they will lock the wheels tight at 15" mercury vacuum.The Taurus actuators are located behind the glove box and are easily removed. I paid $2.50 apiece for mine and I've heard new ones are about $12.I'm relatively new to live steam and haven't had enough experience yet with these actuators to be able to confidently recommend them.
Has anyone else tried them?
George Hoke

Date: Mon, 04 Aug 2003 13:57:55 -0000
From: "solarbake"

Subject: injecto size



Any body recommend what size injector i would need for below (in pint size)
boiler 6.25 diameter approx 16inches long
fire box size 6x6.7 inches approx 42 squar inches
for 3.5inch gauge don youngs lucky 7

Date: Mon, 04 Aug 2003 19:43:06 -0000
From: "chevwilliam"

Subject: Re: Vacuum Brakes



You did not mention if the Tarus actuator is single acting or double acting nor which type of vacuum brakes you were using, straight or automatic.
I have used double acting heater vacuum servos in the past for automatic vacuum brakes but have decided to switch to Clippard or Bimba cylinders and Automatic air brakes for future construction and retofit of existing equipment.
I have seen a few trains over the years loose a conection with straight brakes and end up with no brakes available to stop train on hills with. At best it is embarising, at worst it can lead to collisons or other damage.
Regards,
William Stewart.

Date: Mon, 04 Aug 2003 19:57:25 -0000
From: "chevwilliam"

Subject: Re: injecto size



Injector sizing depends on what the intended steam (or water evaporation) usage is intended and how you want to use the injector(s).
example 1: If you want to leave on injector running to make up steam use when the locomotive is sitting with only the blower, and Possibly fuel atomiser, using steam it would require a very small injector.
example 2: If you want to have the injector run occasionally to make up water when running under full load with a generator, whistle, and vacuum ejector and or air pump running, then a much larger injector would be required.

Perhaps it would be useful to calculate the maximum possible water use under fully loaded operating conditions and select two injectors that would be able to supply, say 2/3 or 3/4 of that water flow each, which would give you some capacity extra in case of urgent need.
I intend to use two Ohlencamp injectors purchased years ago to feed the boiler on my 7.5 gauge 2-4-2 when it is completed. I will also be using a pair of Superscale Locomotive Pop Safety Valves and boiler feed check valves on the locomotive (also purchased years ago).
Regards,
William J. Stewart

Date: Thu, 07 Aug 2003 17:21:01 -0000
From: "fredvv44"

Subject: Re: injecto size



i think the best deal these days is the Super Scale economy injector. it is very similar to the Olenkamp and i've heard good reports from everyone who has used one. if you are in the UK get one of those British made ones but use the largest one you can get.
fred v

Date: Thu, 07 Aug 2003 12:06:59 -0700
From: Greg Robinson

Subject: [ad] GSQ Convention Reminder



Hello All,

It's less than two months away to the Grand Scales Quarterly Convention 2003.
Lots of seminars. The chance to run 15" gauge steamers. And bull sessions with many railroad owners and enthusiasts with a over a thousand years of combined experience in the business / hobby.

http://www.grandscales.com/tour2003/index.html

All the Best,
Greg Robinson

The Grand Scales Quarterly
7+ RAILROADER
Robinson & Associates
P.O. Box 8953,
Red Bluff, CA 96080 USA
530-527-0141
fax 530-527-0420

Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2003 20:25:29 EDT
From: radixauto@aol.com

Subject: Re: [ad] GSQ Convention Reminder



When will the DVD from train mountain be shipped?
Dave

Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2003 13:56:13 EDT
From: douglasandcj@aol.com

Subject: Track Spikes



I'm looking for something I can use for track spikes on 1" wide base rail.
At present I'm using cleat Nails 1" long with serrated edges and drtiven using a modified hand operated stapler to insert in CCA ties. The cleat nails look just like a spike and are used in nailing hardwood flooring but I just thought there may be something a little closer to prototype.

By the way the cost of these cleat anails is approximately $0.02 each.

Douglas G. De Berg

Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2003 20:45:10 -0700
From: "Daniel F. Morris"

Subject: BCSME Train Festival Pixs



I have just posted pixs from last weekends BCSME Train Festival Meet. The weather was a bit rainy on saturday, but by dinner time the clouds had parted and the sun was out. Sunday proved to be a much better day with a good crowd returning to the track to ride the railway. Visitors from the UK Tony Gosling & Mike Johns said that they had a grand time. BCSME is what I describe as an excellent HO track layout, but in 7.5" gauge. Check out Train Festival 2004 August 7th & 8th.

"Live Steaming In The Pacific Northwest"

http://www.sscom.org/pnwls.html

Enjoy!

Dan Morris

Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2003 00:28:17 -0000
From: "chevwilliam"

Subject: Re: Track Spikes



The Los Angeles Live Steamers use screws and tieplates to give a relativly low maintenance track structure. They also use bar style rail joiners and machine screws to join lengths of rail and ballast with "decomposed granite". The combination seems to work when done originally with care and on fully compacted subgrade. I know there are sections that have been in use for several years with very little change of line or level.
Best Regards,
Bill Stewart.

Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2003 06:31:26 +0100
From: "Thomas Scriven"

Subject: Chloe 0-4-2T Baldwin Loco



Hello,

I've just joined the group and I wondered If I could ask you guys for help please. I want very much to build a model of Chloe and I wondered If anyone has scans of the drawings?

Sincerely

Tom Scriven
Scotland UK

Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2003 02:17:01 -0500
From: "Curtis Hustace"

Subject: Re: Chloe 0-4-2T Baldwin Loco



Tom:

The Drawings are only $80 US from Allen Models. If you need contact information let me know.

Curtis

Curtis Hustace

Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2003 11:29:11 EDT
From: douglasandcj@aol.com

Subject: Re: Re: Track Spikes



I appreciate your comments and will probably start out using screws with the hope that eventually a scale looking spike about 1' to 1 1/2" long will materialize. I do use double shoulder tie plates with a 1 in 40 cant and connect the rails with prototype 4 and 6 hole angle bars {rail joiners) using machine screws. I also use a compacted sub grade and crushed limestone 3/4" and smaller with sharp interlocking edges and don't really expect much movement in the track structure, looking as you mentioned to little maintenence with concentration on running and having fun.

Douglas G. De Berg

Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2003 23:32:47 -0000
From: "chevwilliam"

Subject: Re: Track Spikes



I remember back when Railroad Supply Corporation (RRSC) was still in Burbank, CA they had a commercially produced spike about 1/8th square and about 1 1/2 long with a properly formed head and some "teeth" on the sides for 7 1/2 gauge track. I believe that Little Engines (LE) also listed a smaller size spile for 4 3/4 guage track about the same time frame.
I do not know who made the spiles for RRSC or LE but I do remember that you could order them in small quanities (for a small display project) or box lots of 10,000 or more if you were building a home railroad or club layout. Perhaps someone will remember the source for the spiles.
Best Regards,
William Stewart.

Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2003 18:53:32 -0700
From: Greg Robinson

Subject: Train Mountain Video ETA (was GSQ Convention)



Dave,
Sorry for the delay in responding. Was out of the office for a few days (part of it at the Narrow Gauge Meet at the Bittercreek). We are working hard to get the TM video ready before the convention in October. But we would rather be a bit later and produce a better video. Shooting the video is the easy part. The post production of such an involved project is what takes so very long. There have been times when I've spent a whole day getting two minutes of finished video / graphics looking good.

We could slap it together quickly but neither we nor our customers would be happy with it.

All the Best,
Greg
--
7+ RAILROADER
The Grand Scales Quarterly
Robinson & Associates
P.O. Box 8953,
Red Bluff, CA 96080
USA 530-527-0141
fax 530-527-0420

Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2003 00:22:14 EDT
From: radixauto@aol.com

Subject: Re: Train Mountain Video ETA (was GSQ Convention)



Thank you for the reply, I agree that better is worth the wait. Dave S

Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2003 06:33:46 -0000
From: "chevwilliam"

Subject: Re: Track Spikes



When I returned home tonight I pulled out a Gold Plated spike that was sold as a tie tack or lapel pin. It measures 3/32nds square, 1 1/8 from chisle tip to under formed head, and 1 7/32 overall length. I also found a messsage that they were made originally by Hassell , inc in Long Island, N.Y. at the time.
Perhaps if enough demand is voiced they might reinstate ythe tooling aand make aproduction run again.
Best Regards,
William Stewart.

Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2003 07:33:09 -0500
From: "Thomas"

Subject: Re: Re: Track Spikes



Since you used the term "prototype" you need to know the difference between "angle bars" and "rail joiners". For your reference "angle bars" and "rail joiners" are two different things serving a similar purpose (holding the rail ends together). An angle Bar is a specific type of rail joiners that is in an angle iron shape which has part of the angle resting on the top side of the rail base. A rail joiner is a flat plate that bolts to the side of the rail. At least this is the terminology used in full sized railroading (12" to the foot scale). I know that, to most people, the two terms serve nearly the same purpose (and are used to mean the same thing) but the angle bars are a stronger joint than the rail joiners seem to be. Usually in both cases, one is put on each side of the rail. The only time I have seen when only one was used was to get a temporary track in to use for construction and they were short of angle bars or rail joiners. If the track was to be later use as a permanent installation, they would come back and put the second one on to make the joint stronger for heavy usage.
Thomas Scott

Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2003 10:05:10 EDT
From: douglasandcj@aol.com

Subject: Re: Re: Track Spikes



I'm sorry my boy, but you are 100% wrong In the prototype world both terms as well as joint bars, splice bars etc. are used for the same thing. Head free bars don't have angle but are still called rail joiners and visa versa. The terms are somewhat regional and certainly Main line versus branchlie or short line. In this world of modelers one sometimes has to use the terms most people would tend to understand. The hardest people to accept or undertstand anything reeasonable are folks who just don't want to uderstand or think they know it all.

This is a hobby and people will get as involved as they want. If they misuse a term of description or apply the wrong rivit size or inappropriate number of bolts in a bridge gusset, it's okay. The world wont end and they will have fun and support the hobby.

Anyway your comments have not relationship to question at hand which is spikes.

Douglas G. De Berg

Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2003 10:09:47 EDT
From: douglasandcj@aol.com

Subject: Re: Re: Track Spikes



Thanks for the info. I'll start a follow up and if information is found I'll post it on this group line.

Douglas G. De Berg

Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2003 10:12:30 EDT
From: douglasandcj@aol.com

Subject: Re: Re: Track Spikes



Thank you for that information. I'll start a check out on this lead and if anything is found I'll post on this grou;p listing.

Thanks again

Douglas G. De Berg

Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2003 09:29:38 -0500
From: tom artzberger

Subject: Re: Re: Track Spikes



The machine and tooling gave up the ghost many years ago for the spikes that RR supply and LE use to sell. That why they are no longer available. A friend of mine does have a quantity of 1 1/2 scale spikes that he had made a while back and has just ordered a large quantity of 2 1/2 scale spikes (he had the tooling made). He can be reached at

Carl Ulrich
5110 308th. ave
Salem WI 53168
262-537-2692

Tom Artzberger
Pike Lake and Eastern Hartford Shops

Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2003 10:27:49 EDT
From: douglasandcj@aol.com

Subject: Re: Re: Track Spikes



Thanks for the information. I'll give him a call and check it out.

Thanks again

Douglas G. De Berg

Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2003 09:59:35 -0700
From: "Boyd Butler"

Subject: Track Building



The scale look of your track is nice but don't think that you will like it after a year or two as the spikes wont hold for very long before starting to pull out due to rust or grain of the wood not holding them. Screws may not look like the real thing but work great and if used with the Train Mountain tie plates hold the rail very good, but even those will sometimes have to be tightened down. I know these things from experience as I have helped with Train Mountain for about ten years, we have proven what doesn't work and moved on from there. The current use of plastic ties that are grooved for the tie plates in gauge work great even with aluminum rail. We now use steel rail and are changing sections out that are bad and also use it in all new construction. You might get the Train Mountain video on track building. Also remember drainage as that is one problem that has caused us much work over the years.

Good Luck
Boyd Butler,
member Train Mountain and Over The Hill Live Steamers.

Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2003 22:15:21 -0500
From: "Curtis Hustace"

Subject: LE's New Web Site



Sorry to anyone who is getting a cross post, but check out Little Engines new web site!

Curtis

www.littleengines.com

Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2003 08:31:35 -0500
From: "Tom Casper"

Subject: Re: Digest Number 839



Doug, Henry (hank) Balinski has spikes made for his 3 in scale r.r. Maybe he can help. His phone number is 262-857-9232 fax 262-857-6449 He runs a machine shop and has plenty of contacts in the southern Wisc. area.

Later;
Tom Casper

Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2003 20:52:13 -0700
From: Trevor Heath

Subject: Photo's



Photo's taken at two tracks in British Colombia during August can be found here.

http://www.livesteaming.com/photos/photo.html

For those who do not know. Every year www.discoverlivesteam.com hosts a photo competition.

There are three categories this year

Realistic

People enjoying the hobby

Kids in the hobby

Take a look and consider sending in a photo, there are some good prizes from the suppliers to our hobby.

Patrick Durand has entered a photo of his Alaska Railroad F7, probably one of the best "Realistic" photo's ever taken.

So good that when the President of the railroad saw the photo, he started an inquiry into who authorized the budget for the restoration of the prototype...

Take a look, page http://www.discoverlivesteam.com/photocontest/index.htm

TH

Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2003 06:49:16 -0500
From: "Thomas"

Subject: Re: Re: Track Spikes



I do not understand your reply, when you say I am 100% wrong. In you statement below you have reinforced my definition. I was merrily giving a definition to the items you were referring to for clarification purposes. I was not trying to be antagonistic as you seem to be with the response you came back with; I am not your boy; I think I know where you are coming from now since you described yourself, when saying you are one of the hardest people to accept or understand anything reasonable or think you know it all. As you stated, what does this have to do with rivet sizes or number of bolts in a bridge gusset since the reference was track spikes. For you info there is a commercial company making small track spikes for mine rail that would work fine for your use, but since you seem to think I am a know it all or that is what you implied, and you are a know it all, you find it. For the small ties most 7-plus gaugers use the screws since they stay in better than spikes for ties that are usually used in the smaller gauges. To hold spikes in for a long term usage you need good preserved ties that are at least 4" thick.
Thomas

Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2003 19:05:15 EDT
From: GengH@aol.com

Subject: Re: Chloe Drawings



Drawings for the Chloe are available through the designer Gene Allen. The most recent price list of mine lists them at $60.00 US. Gene also has castings available for the Chloe. His casting are good quality with generous allowance for machining. Prices are very reasonable. The drawings are good. Gene is a reputable well established business man and I've enjoyed the relationship we've established while I built his Fitchburg Northern.
Gene is not on the Web or on E-mail. He can be contacted at
5994 Cuesta Verde, Goleta, CA (California) 93117, or by phone 805-967-2095
As a side comment, I am of the opinion that the Fitchburg Northern is a far better and more practical locomotive than the Chloe, and not all that much more work.
George Hoke
Bellevue, Washington, USA

Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2003 16:08:46 -0700
From: Dennis Dalla-Vicenza

Subject: Drawings



Hi all,
Can someone supply me with a name of an individual or company who has drawings available for an 0-4-0 with outside frame and Walchaerts valve gear? I want to build a locomotive in 7 1/2" 3 3/4 gauge but cannot fathom the valve gear parts and what they hang from. Willing to buy the drawings but I don't need the whole locomotive just the frame and wheels and valve gear. It will be going into a large Garrett.
regards
Dennis

Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2003 19:16:59 -0500
From: "Curtis Hustace"

Subject: Re: Drawings



Dennis:

Would RMI have what you are looking for? I don't know what valve gear their Sweet Creek, Columbia or other 3.75" scale stuff has.

Curtis Hustace

Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2003 19:14:20 -0500
From: "Curtis Hustace"

Subject: Re: Chloe Drawings



I agree that the FN is probably a more practical locomtove for hauling passengers and cars. However, keep in mind the Chloe was originally a little plantation engine in Hawaii (it's name was Pokaa). In it's original state, it was a tank engine with a sander position where the headlight is now and a sander on top of the tank. With the extra weight over the drivers and the use of a sander, it becomes a more functional locomotive.
REGARDLESS it is a great little locomotive and you couldn't go wrong with either the FN or the Chloe, it just depends on what you want from your locomotive and what you plan to do with it. I think they are both on the same level of difficulty to build, the FN just has a few more wheels! They both use the exact same castings.

Just my 2 cents worth.

Curtis
Building a Chloe
and Building a Bolt Together Kit Hudson from Little Engines.

p.s. If you all haven't seen Little Engines new site . . . check it out!

www.littleengines.com

Curtis Hustace

Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2003 01:17:25 -0000
From: "chevwilliam"

Subject: Re: Drawings



what scale and gauge? if you meant 3 3/4 scale running on 7 1/2 gauge then perhaps you will be designing your own. I do know that Little Engines has drawings for a 7 1/2 gauge 0-4-0 that might give you the information you need. Also Charlie Docksteader has built up a series of Valve gear simulation / design programs and has placed them on the internet, I believe there may be a link through Sacramento Live Steamers website. I hope this information is of use.
William J. Stewart.

Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2003 21:41:00 -0400
From: Larry Simoneau

Subject: Re: Drawings



Dennis-

The Don Young designed Maxi-Lucky 7 is a 2-4-4 but the driver set is close to what you are looking for, outside frame, 7-1/2" gauge, Walschaerts valve gear and is approximately 3-3/4" gauge. Also has counterweights. The construction series was published in Live Steam magazine starting in January 1977 and running to March 1980.

- Larry

Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2003 16:26:39 -0700
From: Dennis Dalla-Vicenza

Subject: Re: Drawings



Larry,
The Maxi Lucky seven will be a very good place to check the parts for the valve gear. The 0-4-0 + 0-4-0 will be a ride in the cab model.
William,
It will be 3 3/4" scale on 7 1/2" track. To get an idea of the size check out the following site for a picture of the 2-4-0 + 0-4-2 that inspired me http://www.moorsvalleyrailway.co.uk/locopage/15williamrufus.html
regards
Dennis

Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2003 09:17:34 -0400
From: Ronald Thibault

Subject: Re: Chloe Drawings



To add weight, you could cut the frames from plate rather than building them from the 1/2" square stock. I'm doing this for my modified Allen Ten-Wheeler, and instead of milling out the spaces between the axle journals, I'm just going to recess the spaces, to give me more weight on the drivers.

Ron Thibault
Warrenville, SC USA
http://personal.atl.bellsouth.net/t/h/thib9564/

Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2003 15:18:45 -0000
From: "Don Anderson"

Subject: New Member Here



Greetings to all! I'm a new member, and I'm a dealer in 7+ gauge new and used locomotives and cars. Sales & Search. Free listings. Let me know if I can help you out somewhere down the line.
Thanks very much.
Don Anderson
Ride On Narrow Gauge Railways

Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2003 19:27:45 -0700
From: Trevor Heath

Subject: The Moose visit



On Saturday, August 23rd, the Mascot of the Seattle Mariners baseball team, "The Moose" visited the Kitsap Live Steamers in Port Orchard, Washington as part of the effort to bring a minature railroad to the major charity event "Field of Lights" held ever December in Seattle.

Thanks to everyone who came out early to get set up and a huge thanks to Nelson and Barbara Lanchester for their cleaning and painting during the week.

Click here to see the photo's

Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2003 21:21:13 -0700
From: Trevor Heath

Subject: FW: SAR Narrow Gauge Drawings



A recent thread on this list discussed NG Garratt's

John Young in South Africa would be a good source for drawings. He has already produced CD's of the GMAM, 25NC and several other cape gage loco's.

"I finally have the opportunity of getting the full sets of drawings on CD' s, for every single SAR Narrow Gauge Class Locomotive that operated on the South African Railways (Garratt's Included). In order for me to justify this, I need enough parties interested. Each class of locomotive has the complete set of mechanical drawings, scanned from the original microfilm, and is of superb quality.

Each Narrow Gauge Class CD is approx. $60 each ($45 each per Class if you order more than one). Please mail me back if you are interested, so that I can work out what my costs will be to purchase these sets (which are available for a limited time only). If there are enough interested parties that will buy at least one CD (on NG Class), I will go ahead and get them.

In the meantime, you can look at an extensive reference to the South African Railways Steam World on my recently updated website on http://www.ethinticity.com. Please see my site for details on this offer.

Best regards,

John Young"


Additionally, there are photo's here of Richard Stuart's free lance "ride in" Garratt which is getting close to completion.

Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2003 09:53:09 -0400
From: pc26bwr@aol.com

Subject: Re: FW: SAR Narrow Gauge Drawings



.....now don't you just wish that all sites where as good as John Young's ? ( http://www.ethinticity.com). A most excellent presentation, well designed, laid-out, quick to load and easy to get around!

PeterC

Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2003 22:21:36 -0000
From: "Tim Couling"

Subject: Re: FW: SAR Narrow Gauge Drawings



This site also has the most complete set of computer simulations I have seen for almost every type of loco valve gear. Each download is quite small, is variable in all technical aspects and can be used to to design new gear or check an existing arrangement. Check out the "File Downloads" section ( http://www.ethinticity.com)

Regards to all,

Tim

Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 14:29:54 -0000
From: "solarbake"

Subject: fire door types



hello i am trying to build some fire doors for the boiler on my currently loco and wish to use sliding type or the butterfly typethat open by a single lever pivoting from the top does anybody have any sketches pics or photos they could e-mail me with help as i dont no how the opening mechanism works
great thanks for any info
simon h

Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 13:33:36 EDT
From: Jubilatede@aol.com

Subject: Java Narrow Gauge



Here is a site passed along by my son. His parents-in-law originated in Java and this site was sent to Rudy Schuller (the father-in-law) by a friend there who shared the experiences including wartime POW camps. The site is in English although the original transmittal e-mail has a good deal of Dutch. Looks like a fun site, which I've just barely begun to browse.

http://dialspace.pipex.com/javatour/java1997.htm

Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 13:49:06 -0600
From: "Mike Decker"

Subject: Re: fire door types



Hi Simon:

I'll have to look for a drawing or something on the "Franklin No. 8" aka "Butterfly" firedoor, but basically, the two doors pivot on pins attached to the door frame. The door frame is studded to the boiler backhead. The top sections of the doors (behind the air cylinder) have gear teeth on a quadrant of about 90 degrees which keep the doors linked as they open. The air piston has a link on the back side of the cylinder (there's a slot in the back of the cylinder for the link pin) which attaches to an ear on the top of the left door. When you step on the air valve pedal, the piston pulls the ear to the right and rotates the two doors open. The right door has a projection sticking out past the air cylinder for the manual handle. The manual opener pivots on the right-hand pivot/bolt (the two door pivots are also the bolts which hold the air cylinder on, and keep the parts from falling off the frame) and has a loosely (spring) mounted handle that latches into a couple of notches ("cracked" open, and full open) in a "quadrant", radial to the right-hand pin, cast onto the left-front of the air cylinder. We built miniature #8's at Sandleys for our 15" gauge locos...they are really handy, much better than a chain door.

Hope that helps, I'll see if I can find a drawing.

Best,

Mike Decker

Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 13:35:09 -0600
From: "Chuck Hoelzen"

Subject: Re: fire door types



If you machine a gear on the hinge of each door and mesh the two gears you will open them in oposite directions as you turn one.

Chuck

Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2003 17:23:37 -0000
From: "dmmcomo"

Subject: Re: fire door types



Simon -

Como Roundhouse Products has both the Franklin "Butterfly" door and the "Economy" doors available in kit form as sand and investment castings including levers and brackets. These are in 2-1/2" scale for 3' gauge prototype models running on 7-1/2" gauge track but they would also work for some small 2' gauge prototype models.

Write to me offline and I can send you photos. CRP also has an extensive list of other 2-1/2" scale locomotive accessories and car parts.

Rudy van Wingen
dmmcomo@sprintmail.com Como Roundhouse Products

Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2003 16:34:37 EDT
From: Jubilatede@aol.com

Subject: Re: Re: fire door types



Please remember the properly scaled, from standard gauge 4' 81/2', 7 1/4" club tracks when you peddle your fire doors to the gullible.

You know who Suggested to Tom that he should reclaim his narrow gauge purity ere he suffer your terrible wrath.

Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2003 14:56:03 -0600
From: "Chris Lane"

Subject: Re: Re: fire door types



Dear Sir:

I understand from Hubert you offer speeder wheels. I am looking at building RGS Goose #2 or #5 for my first project and am looking for parts. Any parts in your line that you have that would help would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Chris Lane

Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2003 15:38:42 -0600
From: "Chris Lane"

Subject: Re: Re: fire door types



Sorry, I meant to send directly to Rudy

Chris

Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2003 18:38:28 -0400
From: Arno Martens

Subject: Re: Re: fire door types



But Cam, you too are talking about over scale.
Properly scaled is 7-1/16". ;->)
Arno

Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 00:28:30 -0000
From: "Trevor Heath"

Subject: Re: Java Narrow Gauge



Site is run by Rob Dickenson out of England.

He also runs http://dspace.dial.pipex.com/steam/internat.htm which documents surviving working steam in the "Third world"

Rob just returned from Java where he runs a tour each year. He site has current information.

He is also doucumenting the huge amount of stationary steam used in the Sugar industry out there.

TH

Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 03:36:37 -0000
From: "Trevor Heath"

Subject: Re: FW: SAR Narrow Gauge Drawings



I have posted two photo's of a 7.25" gage Darjeeling Garratt taken at the recent big meeting at Pietermaritzburg, South Africa.

http://www.livesteaming.com/photos/photo.html

TH

Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 16:39:52 EDT
From: douglasandcj@aol.com

Subject: Re: Re: fire door types



Actually, if you do your math 1 1/2" scale works out to 7.0625" gauge.
Converted to inches it works out to 7 1/16" gauge or in another world 26.9875 mm

Douglas G. De Berg

Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 17:32:57 -0400
From: Arno Martens

Subject: Re: Re: fire door types



Douglas,
it MUST be an other world as it is 179.3875 in this one.
(184 mm is usually used in the rest of this world.)
Arno

Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 17:56:06 -0000
From: "dmmcomo"

Subject: Not fire door types...



C'mon guys! Old Cam Brown aka Hobbes got you going on a subject that has no bearing on fire door types and you are still carrying the same header!

You discussion as to what constitutes true 1-1/2" scale gauge is all well and good but it has nothing to do with NARROW GAUGE or FIRE DOOR TYPES; so change your headings so that the rest of us that are still interested in the original subject of FIRE DOOR TYPES don't have to read the messages to find out that you are blathering on about a totally unrelated subject.

As for you, Cameron Brown, there is a reason your "aka" is HOBBES; you stuck your tail in and stirred the pot again and got a whole bunch of guys off on another one of their tangents.

Bad tiger, bad tiger!

Calvin

Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2003 17:38:12 -0000
From: "fredvv44"

Subject: Re: Chloe Drawings



i built a Chloe about 8 years ago and have run the heck out of it.
some things i did different from the plans were to use a 6" tube for the boiler, 1.5" pipe for the stack and made the blower a bit larger.
this all makes for a better steaming boiler and can keep up with you no matter how hard you push it.
another consideration is driving this engine. the Chloe has a water tank on the back of the cab and it's a back breaker to run and hard to fire. i made mine as a saddle tank and sit on a flat car with foot pegs on the engine. i can run all day long.
just some thoughts,
fred v

Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2003 20:37:01 -0000
From: "solarbake"

Subject: Re: Not fire door types...



Here here
original fire door poster
solarbake