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7-Plus-NGM Digest December 2002

Date: Sun, 01 Dec 2002 19:39:38 -0000
From: "dmmcomo"

Subject: FOR SHAME!



Hobbes!

You did it again! Posted a personal message on the chat pages instead of sending it offline, and also exposed your tigerish inability to type at the same time!!!

Now you apologize to the group and tell them how they are to obtain a copy of the "New tape out on the resurrection of the WW&F. Good propoganda for us properly narrow gauge types."

Maybe that will pull your tail out of the fire...

Love,

Calvin

Date: Mon, 02 Dec 2002 05:49:55 +0000
From: "Chris Draper"

Subject: Rule of Thumb on Bridges



Howdy All,

Progress on my home rail line (7.25") as progressed to the point the first bridge will be required soon - 18ft long and about 3-4ft high spanning a dry gully. Given I am building for short fat trains, I guess 4 10x2 joists on edge in pairs over trestle bents on 6ft centres should do the job of carrying the weight - but before getting out the saw, I thought I would drop the list a quick email to see what opinions you all may care to proffer!

Kind regards

Chris Draper

Date: Mon, 02 Dec 2002 11:56:36 -0500
From: Dwayne Miller

Subject: Re: Rule of Thumb on Bridges



I belive the number that have been used in my former local club, was it had to support 200 pounds per linar Inch.

I know that we made a bridge on 12' centers, out of a total of three 2x6s, under each track (it was a dual track bridge), each board was spaced out with a scrap 2x4 out from the others, and it would hold a pickup truck with ease according to the engineers who built it.

So doing some quick mental caculations, I would say that not only would it work, it might be some overkill for a single line track.

If you have the materials on hand... go for it.

ENjoy!

Dwayne Miller
Barberton, Ohio

PS: where you at that your considering building a bridge? Its rather cold and snowy in Ohio...

Date: Mon, 2 Dec 2002 12:07:23 -0700
From: robert_morris@agilent.com

Subject: The Saga of Blind Drivers.....



Well Group!

There done.... I turned 16 wheels, "Lead Truck, Drivers, & Tender Trucks," in 2 days while baby sitting our new puppy...... What a relief!!! I am so glad that I'm done with that stage of the project. I did go with the flat tread surface on the center drivers but with a 2 degree entry and exit taper on the outside surfaces. Lots of filing and polishing was required to shine them up but they turned out bitchen!!! I don't think that I will use 4140 for drive wheels again..... They will never wear out but they are a bear to machine...... Lots of nasty hot chips!!!!

I must give props to the Rogers Cooke form tool!! I was able to leave my compound locked in at 2 degrees while finishing up the front and back edges of the flange. I did encounter a little bit of chatter when I was on the finishing pass but this was quickly solved by putting the machine in neutral and cranking it around in manual mode! As long as the tool was sharp it was very easy to remove metal while pulling the chuck by hand! A final finish with the file and some 120 grit made them nice and shiny!

Next step: Axles!!!

Until next time!!

Robert M.

Date: Mon, 02 Dec 2002 17:27:07 -0500
From: rhartsoe

Subject: Re: Digest Number 667



Chris,
I just completed two bridges over a stream, using 4x6x16 pressure treated.
One has 12' between supports and the other has 10' between supports. They are both very solid with no vibration or bounce when going across them with 1200 lbs. and they should last for years. I then used 2x4 cross pieces and laid 5/4" PT deck boards longways to set the crossties and rails on. Very solid and looks good. Since I ride handicapped kids, I made them 4 feet wide for safety. I am making a covered bridge out of one of them 32' long, flooring it with PT plywood and putting doors on it to park my train in. I think double 2x10's are probably overengineering, especially on 6' centers. Also the 4x6 PT beams look more to scale. Also, as a matter of interest for crossties, I use PT 2x2's (actual size 1 1/2x1 1/2"), soak them in used motor oil and kerosene mix (I prefer used diesel motor oil because it is blacker) for a couple of days, let them drain well and they make a beautiful and realistic looking railroad. Mine are 14" long and spaced 4"apart.
Just my 2 cents.
Robert

Date: Tue, 03 Dec 2002 01:58:06 +0000
From: "Roy Stevens"

Subject: Re: Rule of Thumb on Bridges



I don't know about rules of thumb, but I do know load ratings in industrial building projects. 2x10's over 6' would be more than enough, probably overkill. 2x6's would be plenty. In fact, you could span the entire length in one shot if you used 4 14" BCI90XL engineered I joists, giving you an approximate load capability of 300lbs for every foot of your bridge. Just protect them from the weather!

Roy Stevens

Date: Tue, 3 Dec 2002 05:59:46 -0000
From: "Boyd Butler"

Subject: Form Tool



I too used the Rogers Cooke tool, mine were cast iron,I have an Aloris quick change on mine so the form tool is in one holder and I have my tread bit in the other so is very quick to set up for the next operation. I used the advice of Art Crisp from Train Mountian and a retired machinest,turn as slow as your lathe will go in back gear,about 15 rpm and worked great. I dont know how that would apply to 4140 but one might try it.
Am getting ready to make my run of fish belly 1.6 scale flats for my military train,made two prototypes and now for the big one or should I say 7 of them.
Boyd Butler.

Date: Tue, 03 Dec 2002 19:04:14 +0000
From: "Chris Draper"

Subject: Re: Rule of Thumb on Bridges



Thanks to all for your comments. I have been especially intrigued by the comments about treated timber not lasting. Here in New Zealand we have Radiata pine that is pressue treated (to H5 std) and suitable for ground contact applications. Commonly used for Fence posts, house piles, decking supports, retaining walls and other such applications, the life-span is many decades.

I am curious to see if such a treated timber is available in the US?

BTW - the Grades available here are H1-3 mild treatments for indoor use - mostly just bora protection. H4 is for outdoor use, H5 is for ground contact situations.

Chris Draper

PS: My thinking re the bridge had more than a slight coincidence with the fact that I had several lengths left over from a retaining wall!

Date: Tue, 3 Dec 2002 21:31:39 EST
From: Mikado8@aol.com

Subject: Re: Form Tool



Boyd;
May I ask what your going to do with these cars? What Im getting at is this. What will you use for loads. Just curious as my son wants to make up flat car loads as well. Says he saw some reasonably priced tanks at a shop in Cinnci.
Happy Holidays,
Bill Cochrane

Date: Tue, 3 Dec 2002 23:21:17 EST
From: bgwmoxie@aol.com

Subject: Re: Rule of Thumb on Bridges



Chris, Where are you building this 7.25" gauge railroad?
must be in the northeast.....

Regards,
Chris Sylvester

Date: Wed, 04 Dec 2002 08:13:13 +0000
From: "Chris Draper"

Subject: Re: Rule of Thumb on Bridges



Nope - Auckland New Zealand!

Date: Wed, 4 Dec 2002 09:22:52 -0600
From: "Thomas" >

Subject: Re: Rule of Thumb on Bridges



If there are any plans to run a 2.5 scale narrow gauge engine on this 7 1/2" track, you would want to have a lot of "over kill" for the bridge. They are much heavier then you would think. Thomas

Date: Wed, 4 Dec 2002 15:09:31 EST
From: douglasandcj@aol.com

Subject: Readers Choice



It's my firm belief that in order to achieve quality products and services it's important to have a means to measure quality and services. Other than actually going to an elaborate system to accomplish this the choice and recommendations of the users is sufficient to establish a quality or service acceptable to the majority.

If a supplier is offended by not being selected as one of the 5 best so be it. If the supplier is truly interested in being a supplier he will take the readers choice awards as being a goal to shoot for. We may not want to lose a supplier but there are a number of them that need to improve their quality of product or be truly responsive to the customer.

If some suppliers fall out of the main stream it's probably for good reason. There will always be both customers and suppliers who will accept less than satisfactory service or product or who put up with uneducated customers.

I'm tierd of hearing about the lousy customer who doesn't know what he needs or when he needs it and then doesn't pick up the materials when done or fails to pay promptly. This is a factor of being a good business person, you will need to learn to work with your customers and match their expectations with your response and visa versa. In the end, customers and suppliers will need to learn the process of doing business in this limited business hobby world, both need to be educated in how to make the process work.

In real life Readers Choice Awards are common and identify the choice of the majority, others whether candidates or readers either ignor the choice or strive to do better or in the case of the customer buy what they want anyway.

Word of mouth or any other way of personal communication is limited to who you know and who you decide to communicate with, others not in that loop just don't know or are limited to getting only biased information if they get any information at allI.

I think the Readers Choice Award is a good idea and will get more of the interested folks involved in the supply chain and in the hobby. This can only be a good thing for all of serious modelers.

Doug De Berg

Date: Wed, 04 Dec 2002 16:22:36 -0500
From: Arno Martens

Subject: Re: Readers Choice



I hope your 'real life' readers choice awards do not turn out like 'viewers choice' awards on TV !

Arno

Date: Wed, 4 Dec 2002 21:12:03 EST
From: Jubilatede@aol.com

Subject: Re: Rule of Thumb on Bridges



SAME HOLDS FOR 3 3/4" SCALE 2 FOOT PROTOTYPE. Damn caps again- i have a fat left hand finger that hits the cap lock as well as the a. Whilst there is some meeting of the rising scale of dimension verses the generally smaller equipment one models, these are still heavy little beasties. Somewhere in my stuff upstairs is the weight estimate that I ran for the 3 3/4" scale P&R Mogul "Old Star" which never (yet) has gotten off the ground. The 3/4 finished boiler sits in the garage, mocking me every time I go by.

Date: Tue, 10 Dec 2002 19:25:27 -0000
From: "adriansant "

Subject: Plum Cove Studios



Does anyone have any experience with the T Phlatt Car from this company or their trucks? I am thinking of ordering some.

Thank you.

Adrian Sant (UK)

Date: Tue, 10 Dec 2002 18:42:37 -0800
From: "Daniel F. Morris"

Subject: New 1/8 Scale Supplier



To all:

This past summer at the 35th Anniversary Meet held at Illinois Live Steamers, I came across a new supplier. The supplier is "Precision Steel Car" who sells a very nice looking bulk head flat car and also a flat car kit. These kits appear to be very detailed and relatively easy to assemble. Their completed version which I saw was indeed a nice looking and very functional car. From recently obtained information read, they'll soon have a steel coil car kit also.

I enjoyed talking with both Paul & Jeremy about their car and was very impressed with their product.

Check out their site and products at :
http://www.precisionsteelcar.com
see if you don't agree!

Dan Morris

Date: Wed, 11 Dec 2002 22:18:42 EST
From: bgwmoxie@aol.com

Subject: Re: Plum Cove Studios



Adrian,
I have 5 pairs of trucks from Plum Cove Studios;
They ride well and seem to be pretty sturdy.
The price isn't bad either.
The cars they offer are pretty good, too.
I don't have any of those but have seen them being used; And like the trucks are equally a fine product.

Best Regards,
Chris

Date: Wed, 11 Dec 2002 20:28:11 -0000
From: "Boyd Butler"

Subject: Precision Steel Car Co

.

I just got enough grabs and steps to do eight flat cars from them, excelent quality and very good to deal with. One unusual thing about there flat car, its a model of a cast steel one, not the ususal riveted ones. And it so happens that there are two that the rail museum in Pasco Wa has that I took pix of last weekend also.
Boyd Butler

Date: Thu, 12 Dec 2002 18:15:29 UT
From: "Daniel F Morris"

Subject: Precision Steel Car Co.



Boyd;

I fully agree with your comments about Precision Steel Car.

Jeremy and Paul do make a very nice product which I believe is one of the best I have seen to date! They may not be the biggest supplier, but by far one of the best.

Dan Morris

Date: Fri, 13 Dec 2002 16:07:19 -0000
From: "dmmcomo "

Subject: Digest #674



Hey gang -

I am all for sharing info, but aren't we drifting off course here a little bit? Correct me if I am wrong but I thought this was supposed to be a chat group about NARROW GAUGE subjects, not a poster board for KUDOS on 1.5"/1.6" scale products...???

Ye olde Curmudgeon
Bah Humbug!

Date: Fri, 13 Dec 2002 11:59:37 -0700
From: robert_morris@agilent.com

Subject: What ever Happened Too???????



Hey Group!

I was digging thru some pic's last night from the 1990?? L.A. IBLS meet and noticed a neat little engine that I had forgotten about...... Well I guess it's not so little, I think it was 10 1/4" gauge or 9 something????? The steam engine was labeled as "Mesa Grande Western R.R."

Does anyone know about this Railroad or the History of it???? I vaguely remember talking to the gentleman that was with the engine but now have forgotten everything......

Thanks,

Robert M.

Date: Fri, 13 Dec 2002 15:48:12 -0500
From: Arno Martens

Subject: Re: Digest #674



Mind telling me what this is all about.
What kudos are you giving to Digest #674 ?
I copied your whole post, as I cannot find out as to what you are referring.

Arno

Date: Sat, 14 Dec 2002 11:35:54 -0800
From: Dennis Dalla-Vicenza

Subject: Raildriver Cyclopedias Sixth Edition - 1922



Hi all,
Does anyone who purchased the above subject want to let me know what they think of it. I put my copy into my computer and was totally astonished at how well it does what it is designed to. I would like to hear comments both pro and con as I am going to recommend that a copy be purchased as a club reference source.

Merry Christmas
Dennis

Date: Sun, 15 Dec 2002 07:23:58 -0000
From: "Boyd Butler"

Subject: KUDOs



Well I thought that it was better than nothing, just trying to put something out on the net to let some know about a supplier that had been used with good luck,some are into both narrow and standard gauge,Boyd.

Date: Sun, 15 Dec 2002 18:05:48 -0800
From: "Howard Springer" >

Subject: Re: KUDOs



Boyd:
What in H---- are you talking about? I get the feeling that I'm only seeing one side of this conversation.
TIA Howard Springer

Date: Mon, 16 Dec 2002 08:32:17 EST
From: bgwmoxie@aol.com

Subject: Re: KUDOs



Howard
Perhaps, you missed the acholades he gave regarding a 1.5".....Ooooooh Hissss Hisssss Supplier...

Kidding...
Its always good to find a good supplier in this hobby.
But some peoples in this Narrow Gauge group took offense.
Regards,
MKN PWR

Date: Wed, 18 Dec 2002 10:05:04 -0700
From: "Mike Decker"

Subject: Erskine Tramway



Mornin' Folks:

Here's a shot I took this morning of the progress so far on the Erskine Tramway's Shop Terminal. You can see the difference between the "Heywood" style ties and the 1-1/2" scale ties on the track I purchased. Eventually, all the ties will be the larger size.



There will be another switch "point to point" with the far one. The "main line" will diverge to the right, and climb around behind the garage/shop. The "Shed" track will go straight into the engine shed.

Best,

Mike Decker

Date: Wed, 18 Dec 2002 16:43:28 -0800 (PST)
From: Tim Jones

Subject: locomotives



Hey everyone, I've been doing a lot of research on locomotives to build for a first time project. Of coarse I need to finish off my speeder I'm in the process of building, but I don't think it hurts to look around for future projects. So, I'm asking averyone what you think would be a good steam locomotive to build for someone doing this for the first time. I have limited shop facilities here, but access to more capable peices of equipment. I know that I want to build something narrow gauge, and have looked into the fitchburg northern as a possible project.
Thanks for any ideas, Tim

Date: Wed, 18 Dec 2002 17:16:32 -0800
From: Dennis Dalla-Vicenza

Subject: Re: locomotives



Tim,
I am very familiar with the Meg Steam people and will recommend them as a supplier of parts and drawings for a first time builder. The Uncle Sam is my favourite and I recently had a chance to drive their newest "Sam" at the VIME fall meet. They have a web site at http://www.megsteam.com and let me know if you have questions. I know about 6 people who have / are building this locomotive.

Merry Christmas
Happy Chanukkah
Seasons Greetings
Dennis

Date: Wed, 18 Dec 2002 18:46:55 -0700
From: "Mike Decker"

Subject: Decker's Trains Ad



Hi Folks:

I'm sorry for the duplication, but lots of you folks are on multiple lists.

As of today, Decker's Trains is able to accept Visa and MasterCard.

To see my lists, go to http://www.gwtc.net/~mdecker/index.htm

Thank you,

Mike Decker
Decker's Trains
Rt. 1, Box 102-E
Hot Springs, SD 57747
605-745-5487

Date: Wed, 18 Dec 2002 20:07:02 -0600
From: "Bill Laird"

Subject: Re: locomotives



Tim,

I second Dennis Dall-Vicenza's MEG Steam recommendation. However, I would like to add a couple of things.

1) the Fitchburg Northern you mentioned in your first message is not a 2 1/2" scale locomotive, I don't care what anyone else says. It has small drivers, a small boiler, is overall small with a big, out of proportioned cab (so it can be marketed as 2 1/2" scale). I have a good friend who just completed one (with a properly proportioned cab it makes a good 1 1/2" scale locomotive). Due to the small firebox it is very difficult to fire and trying to use an injector on the small boiler just kills all your steam pressure (axle pump or crosshead pump a MUST on this engine).
Just Say No!
2) the MEG Steam engines are very easy to build and plans are good (not perfect, have some errors, but overall good). However, the two as built engines they offer are not American and to my eye ugly. But, the frame, cylinders, running gear, and boiler plans are a good way to start. Buy the plans, study them, get creative and design your own locomotive. I know of seven locomotives built or under construction in central Texas based on the MEG Steam plans, none of which look like any other. The MEG Steam engines are 0-4-0's with saddle tanks. In Texas in the summer the water in the tanks gets so hot the injectors will not pick up. We scrapped the tanks on the locomotive and added tenders. I am personally building a 2-4-0 Porter based on the MEG Steam design and I know of other 0-4-0's, 2-4-0's, and 2-4-2's under construction all based on the MEG Steam plans. They are a great place to start kit bashing a locomotive. I have found Dougal of MEG Steam sometimes difficult to get in touch with, but eventually you can. Shipping can be slow. One of the first cylinder castings he sent me had a void in it, discovered after 2 full days of machining on it. I contacted him and he asked me to send it back and he did replace it several weeks later with a new casting. I know of two other cylinder castings he sent out with similar problems, eventually all replaced with new castings.


Bill Laird
General Superintendent of Operations
Wimberley, Blanco & Southern Railroad
"The Bluebonnet Route"

Date: Wed, 18 Dec 2002 19:52:35 -0800
From: James Hoback

Subject: Re: locomotives



Dennis,

Are they all using the launch style boiler? I hear tales of them running out of steam if you work them very hard. The reason I ask is that I have a Tinkerbell chassis running on air. Plans call for a launch type boiler. I'm not sure if they are up to any hard work.

Regards,

Jim Hoback
Sonora Short Line Ry.
Sonora, CA, U.S.A.

Date: Wed, 18 Dec 2002 22:31:37 -0600
From: "Bill Laird"

Subject: Re: locomotives



Jim,

Let me jump in here a moment. I have a good friend who has a 0-4-0 he built based on the MEG Steam Wendy plans with the marine style boiler (actually he built two of the things in a total of 14 calendar months, shows how simple they are). I have seen him run his engines many times and I have run them many times. There have never been any problems with running out of steam. In fact, one night last summer he pulled 30 cars full of people with one engine on flat track, the backhead was glowing cherry red, not a suggested method of operation, but there was plenty of steam.

Bill Laird
General Superintendent of Operations
Wimberley, Blanco & Southern Railroad
"The Bluebonnet Route"

Date: Wed, 18 Dec 2002 20:33:33 -0800
From: James Hoback

Subject: Re: locomotives



Bill,

Was that burning coal?

Jim Hoback
Sonora Short Line Ry.
Sonora, CA, U.S.A.

Date: Wed, 18 Dec 2002 22:41:59 -0600
From: "Bill Laird"

Subject: Re: locomotives



You betcha! Coal it was, black diamonds that is.

Bill

Date: Wed, 18 Dec 2002 20:53:32 -0800
From: James Hoback

Subject: Re: locomotives



Bill,

Thanks for the information.

Jim

Sonora Short Line Ry.
Sonora, CA, U.S.A.

Date: Wed, 18 Dec 2002 23:08:02 -0800
From: Dennis Dalla-Vicenza

Subject: Re: locomotives



Bill,
Thanks for backing me up on the Meg Steam recommendation. Dougal and I belong to the same club here in Victoria. I am building a very large 3 3/4" scale Narrow gauge Garratt and will be using (haven't confirmed yet) castings from Meg Steam. Dougal is a man of honour and does try to put out an excellent product.
His design is not truly North American but I have seen one that was built in California that was built as a side tank locomotive and it looks great. If you look closely at the basic locomotive it is a perfect size for kit bashing.

Merry Christmas
Happy Chanukkah
Seasons Greetings
Dennis

Date: Wed, 18 Dec 2002 23:22:45 -0800
From: Dennis Dalla-Vicenza

Subject: Re: locomotives



James,
I've watched Dougal Hubner (owner of Meg Steam) and Steve Alder (builder of number 5) work their engines all day long. Steve tends to run very low quality coal in his and besides the great volumes of yellow smoke he produces hugh volumes of steam. The launch boiler is hard to learn to fire but once you've learned for the combustible your using they are very manageable.
The latest Uncle Sam that Dougal is building for sale has a propane burner and a very much improved tender. He hauled passengers all day and even with engineers who were at the throttle for the first time Uncle Sam never ran out of steam.
Steve once was pulling about 8 cars behind his locomotive fully loaded with passengers and our club president running his LE Pacific ran out of steam (no propane) with a fully loaded train. Engine and about 5 extra long cars and fully loaded. Steve eased up behind Bob and upon giving the proper indication coupled up and started to push Bob and loaded train back up the hill to the steaming bays. It sure looked funny with that little 0-4-0 in the middle of the really long train huffing and puffing and actually picking up speed on a 1 1/2 % grade. The Meg Steamer is a really powerful locomotive sitting on a chassis that develops very sticky drivers.
Somewhere I have pictures of this accomplishment.

Merry Christmas
Happy Chanukkah
Seasons Greetings
Dennis

Date: Thu, 19 Dec 2002 08:03:57 -0800
From: James Hoback

Subject: Re: locomotives



Dennis,

Thanks for the encouraging words for launch boilers. I believe I will build one per Tinkerbell's plans. It appears to be about the same as the Meg steam boiler I saw (Jeff Badger's). He switched to propane. I'll use coal.

Grüße,

Jim

der alter Eisenbahner
Sonora, California
http://www.goldrush.com/~jlh/sslry1_001.htm

Date: Thu, 19 Dec 2002 16:12:11 -0000
From: "dmmcomo "

Subject: "The Sherwin-Williams Railway Paints and Colors"



Does anyone know of a source for the above 67 page book most likely printed between 1899 and 1905?

Rudy van Wingen

Date: Thu, 19 Dec 2002 16:25:27 -0000
From: "dmmcomo "

Subject: Message 3111



While I am sure that Plum Cove Studios and Precision Steel Car Company produce fine 1-1/2" scale models, they are not narrow gauge equipment.

Perhaps I have misunderstood the purpose of this chat group and my impression when Hubert started it and I was one of the first to sign up that it was to be a group that discussed the fine points of modeling 2-1/2" scale and larger scale modeling was in error.

If so, I apologize to each and every one of you and assure you that it was not my intention to offend anyone, nor did I intend to be hypercritical.

Happy Holidays to all!

Rudy van Wingen

Date: Thu, 19 Dec 2002 12:08:36 EST
From: btflco@aol.com

Subject: Re: locomotives


Ok now its my turn to jump in on this since the name was mentioned.
Being the owner of Meg Wendy # 3 and having converted to propane and using the marine style boiler, I have yet to run out of steam and have hauled the public in numbers at Bitter Creek and Portola Valley Clubs. Ask anyone who attended the narrow gauge meet at Bitter Creek in August and they will tell you the loudest barking lokie there and hardest working was mine. Not to sound boastful, but this locomotive has been wonderful to operate and will convert from propane to coal in a matter of minutes.

On another note, I went in May to a meet on Fiddletown, CA on a private layout owned by Reno Farinelli. With grades exceeding 7% he and I double headed our Wendy's together. He ran out of steam! and I wound up pushing him and the train up the rest of the grade.

The Meg design is great for those of us who want to kitbash our own style to a proven design. I modeled my Wendy after the 30" gauge Yosemite Shortline Baldwin 0-4-0 Side Tank locomotives. It looks great in my opinion.

Jim, that $20.00 Harbor Freight weed burner I use for firing the boiler has yet to fail me!

Nuff said for now,
Happy Holidays and such
Jeff Badger
SPC Railway
Soquel, CA

Date: 19 Dec 2002 17:08:40 -0000
From: 7-plus-NGM

Subject: New file uploaded to 7-plus-NGM



Hello,

This email message is a notification to let you know that a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the 7-plus-NGM group.
Description : Modified Meg Wendy

Regards,

btflco

Date: Thu, 19 Dec 2002 09:50:59 -0800
From: Dennis Dalla-Vicenza

Subject: Re: locomotives



Jeff,
Being we sometimes get "no coal burners" notices in the Pacific Northwest in a dry summer can you elaborate on the "Weed Burner" firing?
What all has to be changed or do you have two fire box covers?

Merry Christmas
Happy Chanukkah
Seasons Greetings
Dennis

Date: Thu, 19 Dec 2002 18:28:45 -0000
From: "Michael Crofts "

Subject: Re: locomotives



James -

Launch boilers have been used on small engines in the U.K. since 1874 and when the first Tinkerbell was built by Roger Marsh he used one. The original "Tink" still has its original design of boiler but many builders are now using conventional locomotive boilers particularly for commercial operations (eg: Joe Nemeth at the Oldown M.R.). Even the Moors Valley Railway, home of the original "Tinkerbell" has chosen loco. boilers for most of its later machines.
They are just so much easier to fire and control. However you can make a launch boiler steam well; on the 15" gauge at Perrygrove "Ursula" storms up the 3.3% grades with three heavy steel coaches, a brake van (caboose) on plain bearings, and 80 people on board.

Hope this is helpful - James, pse would you contact me off-group again - I can't get through to your email address.

Michael Crofts

Date: Thu, 19 Dec 2002 22:55:34 -0000
From: "Curtis S. Ferrington "

Subject: Re: locomotives



Jeff,

I modeled my Wendy after the 30" gauge Yosemite Shortline Baldwin 0-4-0 Side Tank locomotives. It looks great in my opinion.

In your opinion? Last time I saw that engine was at the Bitter Creek Western track and "It looks great" was EVERYONES opinion. :)

A perfect example of what can be accomplished when the human brain is put to good use.

Curtis F.

Date: Thu, 19 Dec 2002 18:11:50 -0600
From: Curtis Hustace

Subject: Re: Re: locomotives



Boy am I in Trouble! hehe :)

Curtis H.

Date: Thu, 19 Dec 2002 16:50:38 -0800
From: "DOUGLAS F WILKINSON, SHIRLEY WILKINSON"

Subject: Re: Message 3111



Rudy, Hubert and all of the 7plusgroup,

I too thought this chat group was limited to information which would be of interest to all modelers and in particular, the larger sizes. Rudy, I'm sure I'll get in the doghouse but I'll be more to the point than you were.

Sharing and even requesting information or making a connection is fine but I have always felt it was common courtesy for everyone to personalize or chat off line directly with their friends - not on the 7plusgroup site. The party line telephone concept was discontinued many years ago and in my opinion much of what people are writing as of late should not be shared with those of us who have enough problems with spam and other unwanted mailings filling our e-mail boxes.

Please use discretion and courtesy when sending your e-mails to the 7plusgroup site.

Thanks,

Doug from Seattle

Date: Thu, 19 Dec 2002 17:49:48 -0800
From: Dennis Dalla-Vicenza

Subject: Re: Message 3111



Doug,
I'll give you and anyone else out there who are experiencing spam problems this recommendation of a free program..
It has done wonders eliminating all the spam that an account I took over for a service group Ii belong to was getting. Go to http://www.mailwasher.net/ and read up on it. It did work for me took me from about 300 spams a day down to about 3 or 4.

Merry Christmas
Happy Chanukkah
Seasons Greetings
Dennis

Date: Fri, 20 Dec 2002 23:18:04 -0000
From: "adriansant "

Subject: (unknown)



Attn New Zealand members.

Can anyone tell me the website of Whangaparaoa 18 inch steam railway, near Auckland? There is a link on the DMOZ directory, but address is now incorrect.

I am also looking for any other NZ sites to add to the directory. Please let me know of any others that are not already listed.

Thank you.

Adrian Sant
Editor

Date: Fri, 20 Dec 2002 20:13:52 EST
From: btflco@aol.com

Subject: Re: locomotives



Dennis, I have two firebox covers. The burner is rated at 500,000 btu and is more than ample. I have been using it for two years now and am very pleased. Harbor Freight sells the burner for $19.95. I used the valve and the head. I welded the head into the firebox cover leaving the air intake portion of the head exposed. It is easy to relight if the fire goes out, and this winter I am fitting a Piezo ignition to the system.

Jeff

Date: Fri, 20 Dec 2002 18:52:40 -0800
From: "Daniel F. Morris"

Subject: Merry Christmas to All!



It's that time of year to wish you all God's Blessings for a Very Merry Christmas along with a Healthy & Happy New Year!

My site, Live Steaming In The Pacific Northwest now has a holiday touch.
I look forward to bringing you all more Live Steaming in 2003. To be very truthful, it's an awful lot of fun...........................Enjoy!

http://www.sscom.org/pnwls.html

Dan Morris

Date: Sat, 21 Dec 2002 21:51:18 EST
From: bgwmoxie@aol.com

Subject: Re: Message 3111



Rudy,
Perhaps, not everyone can afford to purchase the well detailed, "EXPENSIVE - 2.5" " that are offered nor have the skills necessary to purchase the castings and do the machine work themselves.
In my case the Plum Cove Studios - Arch Bar Style trucks are rugged, for the most part look not so bad under my rolling stock and are cost affective for the short term.
Okay maybe I am a little biased to them because they are local freinds, as well.

As Always, May Your Firebox remain hot, Your Gauge glass level be well above the crown sheet and to all a Merry Christmas, Happy New Year.
Best Regards,
Big Guy w/ Moxie

Date: Sat, 21 Dec 2002 21:56:59 EST
From: bgwmoxie@aol.com

Subject: Re: Message 3111



Gentlemen,
I understand your sentiments;
However, I think the fact that a couple of You get your knickers in a bunch every time the less fortunate merely put out one or two notes each month regarding something other than Narrow Gauge Equipment gets to sounding a little stuffy.
Aren't the majority of us Live Steamers....Lets give these guys a little slack...
"Just delete it"

On the other hand it could all be a conspiracy trying to pursuade us back to Standard Gauge ------ Ooooooooh Bad Bad Very BAD!!!!

Regards,

Date: Sat, 21 Dec 2002 21:57:36 EST
From: bgwmoxie@aol.com

Subject: Re: Message 3111



A better program The Delete Button

Date: Sat, 21 Dec 2002 22:01:20 EST
From: bgwmoxie@aol.com

Subject: Re: Message 3111



Gentlemen,
Without starting too much of an uproar....
Could someone please help me to figure out "How to stop the racey and engaging solicitations regarding young ladies willing and able; And for heavens sakes do any of us really need more inches?

May You All Have A Safe and Happy Holiday Season
Date: Sun, 22 Dec 2002 14:40:37 +0100
From: "Hubert Wetekamp"
Subject: RE: broad gauge

Hello all,

regarding the recent thread on this list, here is my statement:

As I founded the list, it was the reaction of change from the 7+ Narrow Gauger to the 7+ Railroader. I thought, we backyard-narrow gaugers need our own place to exchange and to see the work of others.

So, the invitation for our list is as follow:

The 7+ Narrow Gauge Modellers group should bring all narrow gauge friends together, which run their backyardmodels on 7.25" track-gauge or wider.
The list was founded march 30, 2000.
5" gaugers are also welcome, but the focus should be on 2.5" scale or bigger.

I think, I should add the standard-gaugers beside the 5" gaugers.

I know, that not everyone is able to buy the sometimes high priced parts, or can get them. My models run also on standard-gauge-trucks, which are available here. They run smooth, and you cannot see them under the wide low sitting 3" scale narrow-gauge-car. But I never forget, that I once will replace them with scale (or nearly) scale parts.

So, I in person have no problems, if sometimes a "wide"-gauge product is mentioned, as long, as the main-focus is on the NARROW GAUGE.

And now back to Narrow Gauge:

As mentioned in earlier messages, I'm building a 3" scale version of the RGS Speeder to take it with me next june for the Train Mountain Triennial and the rumble north- and southwards.

And as promised, I just set up a special website to show, how the construction is going on.

So, you can find the first version under:

http://www.7-plus-ngm.org/pcr/speedere.htm

Hope, you like it.

I wish you and your families all a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year 2003.

My hope is, that the Triennial will not be involved by a possible war.

Hubert Wetekamp

Date: Thu, 26 Dec 2002 14:37:25 +0100
From: "Hubert Wetekamp"

Subject: New webpage about my caboose



Hello all,

I used the second christmas - holiday (here in Germany) to set up a page about the construction of my 3" scale caboose. Actual, it's only in english, but the german-version should follow soon.

You can find it, if you will go to http://www.7-plus-ngm.org/pcr .

This is the index-page, and from their, you can click on the different pages including the caboose-construction.

Greetings, and I hope, you had a nice christmas time.

Hubert

Date: Thu, 26 Dec 2002 10:33:01 -0800
From: Russ Wood

Subject: Re: New webpage about my caboose



Hubert,

Now for the most important question, How Much Beer Does It Hold? :o) Great job, looks terrific!

russ@hobby-tronics.com
Chiloquin, Oregon
Date: Fri, 27 Dec 2002 17:37:07 +0100
From: "Hubert Wetekamp"
Subject: Re: New webpage about my caboose

Hi Russ,

Now for the most important question, How Much Beer Does It Hold? :o)

Sorry, can't tell you. Actually, I misuse it as storage area. It normally holds my tool-box, a box with 12 bottles sparkling-water, my photo-bag and a peace of carpet (when I have to do some repairs in bad areas). And still space for some additional clothing, too.

Great job, looks terrific!

Thank you.

Hubert

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 2002 09:36:12 -0600
From: "Thomas"

Subject: Re: Raildriver Cyclopedias Sixth Edition - 1922



Where did you get the Raildriver Cyclopedias Sixth Edition? I have not seen it advertised and an interested as to what it covers.
Thomas

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 2002 15:45:22 -0800
From: Dennis Dalla-Vicenza

Subject: Re: Raildriver Cyclopedias Sixth Edition - 1922



Hi Thomas,
Check out http://www.raildriver.com and look for Locomotive Cyclopedia

Seasons Greetings
Dennis

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 2002 00:41:58 -0000
From: "fredhaskey "

Subject: Re: Raildriver Cyclopedias Sixth Edition - 1922



http://www.raildriver.com

This is for the sixth edition. Does anyone know when the first edition was published? I received this CD-ROM for Christmas and find it to be a valuable reference but things were awfully 'modern' by 1922. I'm hoping to find a similiar reference from earlier (~1900) times. Thanks.

---john.

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 2002 17:03:51 -0800
From: Dennis Dalla-Vicenza

Subject: Re: Re: Raildriver Cyclopedias Sixth Edition - 1922



Fred,
I know Tim is working on the rail car version and I'll ask him if he is doing or has done something from earlier.

Dennis

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 2002 20:54:53 EST
From: dlvisconti4853@aol.com

Subject: Cagney parts



Does anyone know of a source of Cagney D parts?
Thanks,
Dom